25 texts to send a loved one living with depression'

25 Texts to Send a Loved One Living With Depression

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While a text message can’t cure depression, it can remind someone of their worth and let them know they’re not alone. But it can be tricky to know what to say — especially if you don’t understand what it’s really like to experience depression.

So, we asked our Mighty community what text they’d like to receive in the midst of depression. If someone in your life needs a little reminder that could go a long way, here are some messages that might inspire you to send a text of your own.

Here’s what they told us:

1.

i'll give you time and i'll be here when you're ready. i promise.

 

2.  i'm beginning to understand how loud silence can be. forgive me for not standing still enough to hear yours. i'm listening.

 

3.

i can't begin to imagine what you're going through, but know that i'm here for you.

 

4.  i'm so glad you're here.

 

5.

you matter.

6. 

i know this is hard, but i will not give up on you.

 

7.  no matter how dark your days get, i'll be here for you. i'm just a phone call or a text away.

8. don't let the darkness steal the beautiful person you have inside.

9.

  you are enough.

 

10. 

if you want to talk about how you're feeling, i'll listen.

11. 

is there anything i can do?

12. 

this isn't your first or last dark time. i know you can get through this one.

13.  i'll be there to hug you when the sun comes up.

14.  i can't even pretend to know what you're going through, but you aren't alone and you are cared for.

15.

you are never a burden.

16. 

wanted to remind you that you are loved. i know things are hard right now, and that's OK. you don't have to do this alone.

17.

i'm not going anywhere.

18.  remember who you were before the darkness stole your light.

19.

you will NOT let these bad thoughts win.

20. 

your success rate of surviving days like these so far is 100%. based on your track record, you've got this.

21.  you are important in my life.

22. 

do what you can do right now, and no more than that. that's all the universe expects of you.

23.  you make my life better just by being in it.

24.  you are not a disappointment.

25.  i will always have your back.

If you or someone you know needs help, see our suicide prevention resources.

If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

The Mighty is asking the following: Create a list-style story of your choice in regards to disability, disease or illness. It can be lighthearted and funny or more serious — whatever inspires you. Be sure to include at least one intro paragraph for your list. If you’d like to participate, please send a blog post to [email protected] Please include a photo for the piece, a photo of yourself and 1-2 sentence bio. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines




25 Texts to Send a Loved One Living With Depression

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15 Songs to Help You Face Depression This Week

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Facing the world each morning can be difficult when you live with a mental illness. Depression, specifically, can make everyday tasks seem daunting. Getting out of bed and out the door can be a major accomplishment. And although music can’t cure depression (we wish), it’s scientifically proven to reduce stress and even depressive symptoms.

So, each week, we ask our readers what songs and lyrics have helped them through depression. If you need an extra boost this week, hopefully some of these can help.

1. “Invisible” by U2

rain on glass that reads "I am not invisible."

“I’m more than you know, more than you see here, more than you let me be; I’m more than you know, a body in a soul, you don’t see me but you will. I am not invisible.”

2. “Metalingus” by Alter Bridge

light beams that read "I won't look back. I'll fight to remain."

“I’ll never long for what might have been. Regret won’t waste my life again. I won’t look back. I’ll fight to remain.”

3. “Never Surrender” by Corey Hart

blurry lights that read "And when the night is cold and dark, you can see, you can see the light."

“And when the night is cold and dark, you can see, you can see the light.”

4. “Endless Night” from “The Lion King”

clouds that read I know that the clouds must clear and that the sun will shine."

“I know that the night must end and that the sun will rise. I know that the clouds must clear and that the sun will shine.”

5. “Hold On” by Alabama Shakes

Clock that reads So, must be someone up above saying, 'Come on, girl! Yeah, you got to get back up!'"

“So, bless my heart and bless my mind. I got so much to do, I ain’t got much time. So, must be someone up above saying, ‘Come on, girl! Yeah, you got to get back up!’”

6. “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson

Mirror that reads "If you want to make the world a better place, take a look at yourself, and then make a change."

“If you want to make the world a better place, take a look at yourself, and then make a change.”

7. “Skyscraper” by Demi Lovato

Skyscraper with words "Go on and try to tear me down. I will be rising from the ground like a skyscraper."

“Go on and try to tear me down. I will be rising from the ground like a skyscraper.”

8. “People, Running” by Jack’s Mannequin

Traffic with words "We are just these people running around, and I am in no hurry to figure it out."

“We are just these people running around, and I am in no hurry to figure it out.” 

9. “Que Sera” by Justice Crew

magnify glass that reads Tomorrow is a mystery. So let's just do it.

“Yesterday is history. You gotta get through it. Tomorrow is a mystery. So let’s just do it.”

10. “Witness” by Daughtry

crowd with words that read Just look around and see you're not alone."

“Now you’re letting your confusion take control and lead you down a dark and lonely road. Even that won’t last forever. Just look around and see you’re not alone. You’re not alone.”

11. “What a Wonderful World” by Louis Armstrong

sky with words "And I think to myself what a wonderful world."

“And I think to myself, what a wonderful world.”

12. “Something More” by Sugarland

snowflakes with words I believe that happiness is something we create."

“Some believe in destiny, and some believe in fate. I believe that happiness is something we create.”

13. “Odds Are” by Barenaked Ladies

stars with words "Odds are we're gonna be all right for another night."

“Odds are we’re gonna be all right for another night.”

14. “Forget Me Knots” by Heathers

stars with words "It's all right not to feel OK."

“It’s all right not to feel OK.”

15. “The Rain Song” by Led Zeppelin

umbrella with words "Upon us all, a little rain must fall. It's just a little rain."

“Upon us all, a little rain must fall. It’s just a little rain.”

What song do you listen to when you’re feeling depressed? Let us know and we may feature it next week. Check out our previous list here.

If you or someone you know needs help, see our suicide prevention resources.

If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

 

15 Songs That Help When You're Feeling Depressed
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J.K. Rowling Has Perfect Response to Fan Who Feels 'Sad All the Time'

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Just when we didn’t think we could love J.K. Rowling any more than we already do, she does this. The celebrated author of the “Harry Potter” books responded to a distressed fan on Twitter who alluded to depression.

Could you please teach me how to scare the dementors that have been living under my bed?” asked Twitter user @mtrssmustdie. “I’m tired of being sad all the time.”

Rowling has been vocal about her mental health challenges in the past — she faced depression and experienced suicidal thoughts while writing the first of the Harry Potter books, according to the Guardian. She had this to say to the fan: “They’re bothering a unique, valuable human being who deserves happiness. Ask for help. Don’t fight alone. Big hug.”

She also retweeted some advice from another fan who suggested eating chocolate helps fight dementors as well.

This isn’t the first time Rowling has dispensed some wisdom to fans facing challenges. In May of last year, the author responded to a tweet about failure.

“This may get lost in the noise…” the fan’s tweet read. “But what wold you say to someone who has failed to find meaning and wants to finally give up?”

Rowling first responded with some inspirational photos and then said, “And I’d say, the world is full of wonderful things you haven’t seen yet. Don’t ever give up on the chance of seeing them.”

h/t Seventeen

Related: The Artist Behind the Painting J.K. Rowling Just Called Out on Twitter

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What I Want My Younger Self to Know About Our Future With Depression

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Depression — it sounds bizarre, this new term that’s now being thrown into your vocabulary.

You’re 14, barely into your teens, and now you need to deal with this thing they’re calling depression. How do you sort out normal pubescent hormones versus this disease that’s causing you extreme sadness and emptiness? Are the mood swings typical
teenage behavior? Are the constant fights with your parents “normal?” You’ve been through so much in the last few months — moving to another state, leaving your birth home, leaving your friends, starting high school. What is normal?

This new label comes with a stigma. You are now considered “mentally ill.” You are not strong enough yet to rise up and advocate for yourself. You’ve only been told no one discusses anything that’s “mental.” You will begin group therapy with a handful of other teenaged kids trying to figure out which emotions are depression and which are “typical.” They, like you, will stare off into space during group, not wanting to be there, pretending they know everything, thinking this will not help them. 

But it does help you. As much as you may not want to pay attention, you do. You come through this and survive with therapy and support alone. You are a rock star.

I would be lying if I said this is the only time you battle this disease. You will suffer again in four years at 18. This time you don’t even realize how deep you’ve sank until you’re sitting on the carpet of your bedroom going through the pros and cons of killing yourself over and over in your head. You feel you’re being ignored, but this one act gets you heard. Since you’re legally an adult, aside from therapy, you’re now thrown into the grasps of psychotropic medications. I admire you, you are not afraid. You do as you’re told and swallow the pill without a fight. Once again, you do this in silence as the stigma is still very present.

Teenage Stephanie, I wish I knew then what I know now. I’ve been repeating this phrase often, recently. The mental pain, the delusional thoughts of hurting yourself, the repetitive feelings of worthlessness and that you don’t deserve love…it only gets stronger each time you battle it. I wish I could tell you it’ll hit you again in college because you’re feeling isolated and stressing over grades. I wish I could warn you of the major battle you’ll face after you give birth to your daughter culminating with your first hospitalization.

I wish I could tell you that was it, but it’s not. You’ll be hit two more times — the last will be the worst you’ve ever experienced. It’s been over a year and although I’m much better, I’m still at war with those demons.

But what I can tell you, Steph, is that you survive. You start to realize things that trigger you and avoid them. You grow to realize when the thoughts of negativity are returning, although you may not act as soon as you should, you do get help. Ah, yes, the alpha in you learns to ask for help. You will experience a multitude of drugs ranging from antidepressants to antipsychotics. You will have fleeting moments where you want to jump in front of a car, but you’re strong enough to overcome them.

You will fight the stigma by becoming a huge advocate for depression, telling your story to everyone. You will be a battler, a survivor and a warrior. You will rise up.

Love always,

Your adult, 30-something self.

If you or someone you know needs help, see our suicide prevention resources.

If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

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When Depression Is a Terrorist

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I have a personal enemy. Many people call him Depression, but I know he’s really a terrorist.

Labeling depression as a terrorist may seem dramatic and harsh, but that’s what it feels like to me. It hijacks my attention and threatens the essence of who I am. It terrorizes me with judgment, accusations and fear. I’ve built up years of defenses, but he evades them all. During these seasons, he sets off explosions of self-doubt that send ripples through every area of my life.

Everything I see and hear seems to reinforce the accusations. They scream in my ears. At times, it’s so intense I want to end the pain. I don’t want to die, but I don’t want to live this way either.

It’s difficult to explain. When I’m low, I desperately want the numbness and pain to end. Nothing helps. All hope is drained. I think this journal entry explains it best:

I feel low. Slept 8.5 hours and I could stay in bed. My thinking is slow, like my brain is full of glue. It’s as if I have sunk beneath the basement and I have no idea how to get out.

A few weeks ago, I talked with some of my coworkers about my experience. When I said the words, “I suffer from depression,” in my mind I heard screams of self-hate. My terrorist threatened me. He told me that if I said any more, he would take away my friends, my career, my professionalism and my dignity.

I live with the fear that if I tell people I’m depressed, they’ll somehow think less of me. Yet in my experience, the more I isolate, the more powerful the depression becomes. Confronting my fear and defying the threats are the only way to lift the depression. No matter how hard it feels, living life one day, one moment at a time, is the best therapy, even though part of me feels dead inside.

When the moods hit, being alone can become a WMD: A Weapon of My Depression.

Eventually the seasons of depression lift and I go back to my life. I begin to feel strong again — I hope I will feel good forever. I guess I like to live a lie and imagine my depression is gone for good. But it’s not. He may become quiet, but I know that my terrorist will never truly go away.

Despite this, depression has given me several gifts, although I admit it seems odd to thank something I describe as a terrorist. As a human and spiritual person, one of the gifts I try to give myself is learning from my depression.

When I’m depressed, I become deeply reflective. I express my pain through drawing, journaling and other art forms. It’s as if the experience of depression causes me to mine the depths, searching for veins of experience, grasping for anything that will make value out of this. Sometimes this can be too much. I can become self-critical and I can take things too personally.

Depression tears away at your layers, making you more raw and more vulnerable. Yet you become more available, more real. Sometimes I move too fast through life. Depression has a way of stopping me and forcing me to become real again. I wish it were easier, but for me this is how life is.

My hope in sharing this is to encourage someone suffering to give words to their pain. Healing may come slow, but it will come. If you are suffering, tell a friend or a family member who you trust. And please, get professional help. It may just give you your life back.

A version of this post originally appeared on The Good Men Project.

  The Mighty is asking the following: For someone who doesn’t understand what it’s like to have your mental illness, describe what it’s like to be in your head for a day. If you’d like to participate, please send a blog post to [email protected] Please include a photo for the piece, a photo of yourself and 1-2 sentence bio. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

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The One Thing I Can Do, Even When I'm Feeling Hopeless

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I was running late that day. I was supposed to attend a meeting for my campus’ To Write Love on Her Arms group and got lost in the maze of buildings on campus. I was already half an hour late, and at that point thought perhaps I should just give up and go to the math center to study until my husband came to pick me up. For some reason, I didn’t do that, but instead emailed the president of the club to see if she would redirect me to the right room. I thought it was a long shot since people don’t usually respond to emails quickly.

Surprisingly, she did, and moments later came, got me and took me to the room where we were meeting. It was there I met Elizabeth. To Write Love on Her Arms is a mental health advocacy group and was also somewhat of a support group for the students in attendance. That day, the theme of the meeting was stress, since finals were approaching.

I asked if it was OK for me to share what I had learned from a recent workshop called “Cultivating Resilience.” The president was kind and let me speak about what I had learned. I even showed the video I had seen during the workshop on the “ABCs of Resilience.

At the end of the session, Elizabeth told me that she was thankful I had joined the meeting. She needed to hear what I had shared, and was struggling to overcome her own self-criticism and negative self-talk. She said she hadn’t expected to come to the meeting and find answers to her problems. I was surprised that what I thought was just off-hand information was so helpful to her.

I then shared with her my struggles with depression, anxiety and ADHD. I told her how just that morning, I had visited my psychologist at the counseling service office for crisis-intervention — I had been feeling suicidal the day before. My psychologist asked me what I thought my purpose was, and I was having a hard time giving her an answer.

When Elizabeth thanked me, I realized that my purpose was to keep talking and sharing my story and experiences — to touch lives and share meaning with others whenever I can.

I told Elizabeth I felt a deep connection to her, and despite knowing next to nothing about her, realized that what little I had said to her had touched her life. That I, someone who felt purposeless and hopeless, was able to share a glimmer of hope to someone else who was struggling. That itself gave me hope. It shifted my perspective that evening and I realized that despite my hopelessness, I was still able to do good for others. It made me realize that my life is as valuable as everyone else. Despite the depressive episode I’m going through, I can still do good in the world.

It was thanks to Elizabeth that I made that connection and realization. Though my psychologist had already talked me down the figurative ledge that morning, Elizabeth gave me a reason to walk away. Just by telling me what I had shared with her had been impactful, she gave me a reason to keep going. And for that, I will always be grateful for our chance and seemingly random meeting.

If you or someone you know needs help, see our suicide prevention resources.

If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

The Mighty is asking the following: Write a letter to a stranger or someone you don’t know well who showed you incredible love recently. If you’d like to participate, please send a blog post to [email protected] Please include a photo for the piece, a photo of yourself and 1-2 sentence bio. Check out our Submit a Story page for more about our submission guidelines.

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