Chris Cornell's Family Starts Music Therapy Program After Singer Dies By Suicide


On Thursday, June 20, Chris Cornell’s family foundation donated $100,000 to start a music therapy program for children in Seattle. That day would have been the Soundgarden singer’s 53rd birthday. He died by suicide on May 17 of this year.

The Chris Cornell Music Therapy Program in partnership with Childhaven, a Seattle-based nonprofit, will work with children under the age of 5 who have been affected by abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse and other issues.

“The Chris and Vicky Cornell Foundation is excited to join Childhaven to support its extraordinary work impacting the lives of those in need,” Vicky Cornell, Cornell’s wife, said in a statement according to the Los Angeles Times. “Chris and I always shared a strong belief in the healing and inspiring power of music, and through Childhaven’s establishment of this program, we are able to keep the promise for Chris by continuing to protect the world’s most vulnerable children.”

Also launching this month, following the death of Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington, is Music Minds Matter, a mental health campaign from Help Musicians — a U.K. organization dedicated to the health and welfare of musicians. The organization is currently accepting donations with the goal of creating a 24/7 hotline for musicians in need, which they hope to launch later this year.

“This unique service will revolutionize the way musicians and the music industry think about mental health. It’s been a long time in coming and I strongly urge the music community to support this brand new fund,” bassist and international development executive Matthew Leone told Metro.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “HOME” to 741-741. Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

Header image via Chris Cornell’s Facebook page. 


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