chester in linkin park video

12 Linkin Park Songs That Have Helped People Through Dark Times

13k
13k
48

Editor’s note: If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “START” to 741-741.

Hearts across the world broke on Thursday upon hearing the news Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington died by suicide. The 41-year-old had struggled with drug and alcohol addiction for years and said he had suicidal ideations after being abused as a child by an older man.

The confusing and complex emotions that often come with experiences like Bennington’s are sometimes impossible to articulate, and yet, the singer repeatedly described his feelings in beautiful, heartbreaking, sometimes angry and sometimes therapeutic songs — ones that resonated with millions. It seems while he dealt with his own pain, he helped people around the world make sense of and cope with their own.

We wanted to recognize that, so we asked our mental health community to share a Linkin Park song that got them through (or continues to get them through) a dark time in their life. We miss you already, Chester — thank you for helping so many of us.

If you or someone you know is questioning your own worth, especially in the wake of this news, please reach out for help. You are worth it.

 

1. “Numb”

“This song always spoke to me. I grew up always feeling pressure to live up to everyone else’s expectations of me. I would sit in my room and scream to this song when I was home alone. I was always numb, and having a song that so perfectly captured how I felt at the worst time in my life was one of the few things that kept me afloat. I would sit and watch Fuse for hours hoping to hear it, or any other Linkin Park song. But when I think of Linkin Park, I always think of ‘Numb’ first.” — Diedra S.

“I can’t even pick just one. Every word to every song helped me through the worst times of my life. They saved my life numerous times, and still to this day, they are my therapy. Yesterday’s news shattered my heart, I only wish that someone did for him as he did for me countless times! However, ‘Numb’ was my go-to song, because that’s how I felt throughout high school.” — Alanna S.

2. “Breaking the Habit”

People were always asking me why I self-harmed, and this song just summed up my thoughts and what it was like to be in the chaos of the moment. I never had words for how I felt. Linkin Park created entire albums that allowed me to speak.” — Kristen B.

3. “What I’ve Done”

“‘What I’ve Done’ is a very important song to me every day. It reminds me that we make mistakes but all we can do is try to do better. Try to make better and more positive choices for ourselves.” — Charlie K.

4. “Easier to Run”

“Chester couldn’t perform it live this was so personal to him. It’s about his childhood abuse. I, like him, was sexually abused as a child. I didn’t acknowledge it or work through it until four years ago as an adult just like him. This song made me feel understood, validated, and not alone. I felt like I had an ally in my battles. All of his songs gave me a voice to borrow at a time when I didn’t have the strength to use my own. I sang with him. I loved and felt pain with him. And now I cry for him. Thank you, Chester and Linkin Park for 20 years by my side and in my mind. Thank you for five amazing concerts. Thank you for years of feeling like someone understood me. Thank you for singing the strength to keep going when I thought I couldn’t do it anymore. Thank you for your life and your songs and your dedication. Thank you for you.” — Megan M.

5. “Figure .09”

“‘Figure .09’ spoke to me while I was being sexually abused as a teenager. I didn’t know at the time that Chester was also abused as a child, but the lyrics comforted me in the aloneness of my feelings. Even now when the pain comes flooding back, their music sees me through the darkness. Rest in peace, Chester. I’m sorry you hurt so much.” — Jane M.

6. “Papercut”

“Oh where do I start? The song ‘Papercut’ always was a relatable song. Through my teenage years my life went to hell, it was bad relationships, abusive partners, bullying, some other things I don’t want to say, but I always played that song on the way to school, on the way back. When I was at home I’d lay in bed all day with Linkin Park among a few other bands, but ‘Papercut’ was my go-to song. It helped me make sense of my emotions and thoughts and helped me find some peace in the knowledge that I wasn’t alone in the pain I felt.” — Jessie M.

 

7. “Leave Out All The Rest”

“‘Leave Out All The Rest’ is an anthem for anyone who’s ever suffered from mental illness. It was a meaningful song to me, before I even knew I had a mental illness. The notion that if you’re gone, no one might care or miss you is a reality for a lot of people going through depression. Hoping that you’ve left a good impression on someone when you’re no longer here is what all of us hope for.” — Leticia L.

“As soon as I heard that Chester was no longer with us, ‘Leave Out All The Rest’ began to play in my head. With that said, there isn’t just one song that helped me through my dark times. All of their songs from every single album has personally touched my soul in ways I can never fully describe. They were the only band in my youth that seemed to understand the battles I fought within myself. Their lyrics spoke for me when I could not. I wish they knew how many times they saved me, when I felt I could not be saved.” — Linda T.

8. “The Messenger”

“Just the lyrics alone speak volumes. ‘When you feel you’re alone. Cut off from this cruel world. Your instincts telling you to run. Listen to your heart. Those angel voices. They’ll see to you. They’ll be your guide. Back home where life leaves us blind. Love keeps us kind.’ Just the message in those lyrics have brought me out of my darkest places. His voice, the visceral power behind it, just strikes a cord in me that leaves me with chills. No matter how down I am, no matter what is going on. I know I can listen to that song and find hope. Remember that I am loved and that even though the world can be cruel, it’s that love from friends and family that keep me going.” — Travis K.

9. “Crawling”

“‘Crawling’ and ‘One Step Closer’ helped me when I was a young teen and didn’t quite understand the anger I was feeling. It helped me express that anger in a surprisingly healthy way. Something major about Linkin Park’s music was how much it helped normalize difficult emotion. I’ll never forget how it made me feel, and I hope to pass that on to future generations. Rest In Peace, Chester, may you live forever through your music and memories.” — Lucy B.

10. “Heavy”

“There are so many, dating all the way back to high school! I heard ‘Heavy’ shortly after I was released from a psych ward stay, when I was still struggling very much with my depression and anxiety, and it was one of those ones when you stop and soak in every word. ‘I dont like my mind right now, stacking up problems that are so unnecessary…’ It remains a favorite on tough days.” — Julie M.

 11. “Shadow of the Day”

“That song always made me feel better. To me, it has a very soothing quality. I couldn’t help but sing along when it came on. By the end of the song, I would feel that my problems would just melt away.” — Amanda F.

12. “Castle of Glass”

“You’re asking for a single shade of grey here… they’ve always been a favorite jam of mine. ‘Castle of Glass’ guided me towards realizing and accepting my own identity in the midst of anxiety and depression from childhood trauma and a family broken by alcoholism, drug addiction and violence. Rest easy, Chester. Till you blow the speakers right out of my car!” — Nick S.

“I can’t choose just one. There have been so many dark times in my life, and Chester was there through every single one, reminding me that I was never alone. Even when I had nobody to talk to, nobody who cared enough to ask if I was OK, he was there. He was not OK, too. And it was OK to not be OK. He saved my life, over and over, since I was 13 years old. Linkin Park, and Chester’s unique, beautiful vocals are a hugely important part of my daily life. I’m hollowed out, gutted, thinking of a world without him in it.” — Robi K.

Editor’s note: The Mighty follows suicide prevention experts’ recommendations for reporting on suicide. When sharing or reporting Bennington’s death, please refrain from sharing the method.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “START” to 741-741.

If you or a loved one is affected by sexual abuse or assault and need help, call the National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline at 1-800-656-4673 to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

12 Linkin Park Songs That Have Helped People Through Dark Times
13k
13k
48

RELATED VIDEOS

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

How Linkin Park's Lyrics Saved My Life

1k
1k
10

I was in a deep depression eight years ago and I distinctly remember dropping my son off at daycare in the summer of 2009. On the way home I kept thinking about how much better off he’d be without me. I pulled into my driveway and walked into the house and turned on the TV to one of the music channels — VH1 or MTV, I can’t remember which. I remember the distinct sound of Linkin Park’s opening keyboard sounds to “Leave Out All The Rest” coming through my speakers. I stopped and stared at the video on the screen and then Chester’s voice came through and I broke.

The lyrics played out as though they’d been pulled directly from my mind and I remember feeling for a moment as though they quite possibly had. I found the song after that on iTunes and played it on repeat until I stopped crying. No one knows how close I was to suicide that day. No one knows that particular piece of music pulled me out of a dangerous moment.

The news of Chester Bennington’s death by suicide knocked the wind out of me and I feel somewhat haunted now by my own experience. I’m so incredibly sad for him and those he left behind who love him. I think he left behind plenty of reasons to be missed. I choose to remember the moments of solace his voice brought and I’ll “leave out all the rest.”

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Photo via Linkin Park Facebook page.

1k
1k
10
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

My Challenge to Anyone Hurting After Chester Bennington's Suicide

3k
3k
9

When the news broke Thursday that the lead singer of Linkin Park, Chester Bennington, died by suicide, it hit me like a sucker punch to the gut. I couldn’t believe it.

Tears in my eyes, I started writing.

I really didn’t know what I could write because at times like this I’m not sure what to say. I don’t have any wisdom to give or platitudes to bestow. And I don’t have an appropriate, uplifting quote from a celebrity or religious figure to post.

I’m at a loss for words.

There is nothing that can be said on a days like this that will make the pain of the friends, family and fans of Chester Bennington go away.

In times like this, friends, family and fans of the departed endlessly search for answers.

Why would he do such a thing? How could he do such a thing?

He seemed to have it all, why couldn’t he just be happy?

Maybe these questions will be answered in time. Maybe they won’t.

Maybe it is best that these questions remain unanswered.

But in the end, we must learn to listen to each other more.

Suicide is not a fucking joke.

Every 12.8 minutes someone in the United States dies from suicide. Men are 3.5 times more likely to die by suicide. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, with highest suicide rate among adults between 45 and 64 years of age. Chester was 41.

 

We can no longer recoil in horror when someone says they are suicidal and ignore pleas for help. We can no longer force our heads into the sand like an ostrich and pretend that suicide does not exist or suicide is not our problem.

Instead of just playing the music library all day to remember the departed, I challenge all of you to become more active in suicide prevention. At the end of the day, we are here on Planet Earth to help one another. And by being more proactive to spread suicide awareness, we can save more lives and Chester’s death will not be in vain.

I hope that Chester’s friends and family will come to a place of healing throughout the months and years to come.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “HOME” to 741-741. Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Lead photo via Linkin Park’s Facebook

3k
3k
9
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Musicians React to Linkin Park Singer Chester Bennington's Suicide

11k
11k
23

On Thursday, news broke that Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington died by suicide. Linkin Park’s music, and Bennington’s raw and real lyrics, were important to so many fans — but also to so many musicians. Some have taken to social media to express their grief, and offer condolences to his friends and family.

Bennington was open about his struggles with addiction and suicidal ideation. In reaction to his death, a few musicians had messages for people who also might be experiencing suicidal thoughts, or struggling with their mental health.

Paramore’s Hayley Williams, who has been open about experiencing depression, tweeted about an artist’s often challenging role to bring light into a world full of so much darkness.

It’s also important to remember that middle aged men have the highest risk of suicide, compared to any other demographic. Bennington died at age 41. Chris Cornell, lead singer of Soundgarden, died by suicide just two months ago at the age of 52.

When musicians write songs that resonate with us so deeply, cutting to our core in dark moments when we need them the most, it can be easy to forgot they too carry this darkness. After Cornell’s death, Mighty contributor Darshita Jain wrote a piece addressing this. She said:

Chris’ songs talk about death repeatedly. Cries about self-expression, self-worth, grief and the deep dark pit he lived in, repeatedly. And I never paid attention to the fact that they came from him, his suffering, and instead used them to resonate with my own.

Maybe we should stop using art to say “me too” and listen, really pay attention, to what the words mean, see what the artist is really telling. Not miss the signs, not only use the signs.

Maybe we should stop only responding to art, but really look at it.

Musicians and other people in creative fields — you can access darkness without letting go of the light. We need you to stick around. If you’re ever feeling hopeless, here are some resources that might help:

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255

Reach the Crisis Text Line by texting “HOME” to 741-741.

Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

Watch Linkin Park perform “One More Light” in honor of Chris Cornell below:

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “HOME” to 741-741. Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

Lead image via Linkin Park’s Facebook page

11k
11k
23
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
Chester Bennington

Linkin Park Singer Chester Bennington Dies By Suicide

39k
39k
95

Chester Bennington, the lead singer for Linkin Park, died by suicide, TMZ reported on Thursday. The singer was 41 years old.

According to TMZ, Bennington struggled with drug and alcohol addiction for years, and said he had suicidal ideations after being abused as a child by an older man.

Bennington was friends with Chris Cornell, the lead singer for Soundgarden, who died by suicide in May. After Cornell’s passing, Bennington shared an open letter to the singer on Twitter, thanking him for talent and friendship.

Reacting to the news, fans and friends shared their condolences as well as how Bennington and his music affected them.

MIGHTY PARTNER RESOURCES

If this news is hard for you, know you are not alone — and there is help for people who are feeling suicidal. You can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

Editor’s note: The Mighty follows suicide prevention experts’ recommendations for reporting on suicide. When sharing or reporting Bennington’s death, please refrain from sharing the method.

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “START” to 741-741.

If you or a loved one is affected by sexual abuse or assault and need help, call the National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline at 1-800-656-4673 to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

Photo via Linkin Park Facebook.

39k
39k
95

RELATED VIDEOS

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Functionally Suicidal: The Truth About Living on Borrowed Time

3k
3k
25

I’m not good right now.
I’m not well at all.

But here I am!
Right over here.
I’m still alive.

Beating the odds
As I’m holding on by a thread.
Walking a tight rope 50 feet from the ground wishing the wind would blow me off
Onto some rich douchebag’s BMW.
Splat.
Fall down go boom.

And yet within this self-destructively suicidal wish,
I hope a magical safety net would fly from out of nowhere to catch me as I fall.
And I wish someone was there.
Anyone who would give a fuck enough about me to hold me as I break the fuck down.

But yet here I am.
Alone.
Me against the world.
Fighting the good fight.
Trying every day to walk away from the darkness toward the light.

Functionally suicidal I guess
As I try to live a normal life.

I still go to work every day.
I pay my bills
I file my taxes
I write these blog posts.

I try to remain as hopeful as I can.
But I’m crumbling inside.
I’m drowning
In a sea of self-doubt and regret.
I’m sucked into the unrelenting quicksand of my blackened mind.
Choking.
Suffocating.

I continue to willingly live with the darkest recesses of my poisoned mind.
The darkness is slowing overtaking the light.
In here everything stays the same
And nothing will ever fucking change.

I can’t fucking take this shit anymore!

So the eternal question still remains:
Should I stay or should I go?

The continually running juxtaposed narrative of wishing I was dead
Yet by finding too much beauty in the world I’ve made at least one excuse to live.

The bitter pill of truth says
I am just as worthless as I was when I was at age 16.
The sweetness of the nectar of lies says
I can survive to fight another day.

This is the co-dependent duality of my fucked up so-called life.

I don’t know how I’ve made it this far.
I don’t know why I’m still alive.

But I am.
I’m still here.

I keep going.
I keep moving.
I keep living.

And I’m still fucking standing.

I’m not sure if I’ll make it to age 65.
I’m not sure if I’ll make it to this summer.
I’m not even sure if I’ll make it to tomorrow.

Living on borrowed time in this temporary shell of skin and bone and blood.
Functionally suicidal I guess.

MIGHTY PARTNER RESOURCES

But I can try
To stay alive
To live to see another day.

I have to try
To stay alive
So I can see another sunset
Or see anther sunrise.

I need to try
To stay alive
So I won’t die.

 This piece was originally posted on The Lithium Chronicles

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “HOME” to 741-741. Head here for a list of crisis centers around the world.

We want to hear your story. Become a Mighty contributor here.

Unsplash Photo via Glenn Carstens-Peters

3k
3k
25
TOPICS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Real People. Real Stories.

8,000
CONTRIBUTORS
150 Million
READERS

We face disability, disease and mental illness together.