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4 Small Businesses Run By People With Autism

Recently I’ve been doing my research into small businesses run by people with autism. So I’ve created this article to help show the various businesses people with autism own. I also wanted to put some positivity out there for adults with autism as the support and information for us is minimal.

A stable job and income can be hard for us with autism, but it can also be extremely rewarding. Jobs not only allow us to grow professionally, but personally too. They help with our social anxiety, they help with our communication skills and they especially help with our confidence.

Since starting A Million Stories I have gained a lot of new skills. Skills I never thought I’d have before. I’m more organized in my work life, I’m communicating with more people then I ever have in my life. I’m more prepared for the unexpected and most importantly, I’ve gained confidence and reduced my anxiety levels.

Having your own business is never going to be easy, but the rewards you get from it personally outweigh the stress that comes with it.

Interested in supporting a business owned by someone with autism? Here are four businesses you can check out…

1) A Million Stories

We sell a wide variety of children’s books. Not only books though, we sell games, jigsaws, baking kits, activity packs and more. We also have a lot of tools and guidance for the autism community as we understand personally how hard it can be living with autism. We’ve got some amazing books that can help with feelings, day to day life, school and so much more! Come check out our page and feel free to message us as we can create personalized bundles suitable for age, interest and budget.

2) The Growing Club

Jane Binnion, the founder of The Growing Club CIC, based in Lancaster, is dyspraxic and on the autistic spectrum, along with other members of her family. Jane went self-employed in 2010 and realized that self-employment is a great option for some people with disabilities as we can set our own agenda, whereas employment can be too hard if others do not understand the challenges. Jane said, “One of the things I struggled with most as an employee was the office politics.” The Growing Club designs and delivers employment and enterprise training for women. Jane has been delighted by how many women with disabilities or long-term health issues have felt safe enough to join the courses on offer.

3) Think Musique

Sarah, the founder says: I set up Think Musique in order to be able to support CEOs and autistic adults with the challenges faced in creating balance in their relationships and their lives. Through targeted and holistic coaching, I support clients to firstly redress how they look at their goals — work-life actually becomes life-work balance. From there I run programs that include various coaching techniques, giving clients the opportunity to talk and be heard, turn fears into manageable step goals, take time to process thoughts and feelings about conflicts, truly appreciate the distance traveled and create genuine confidence.

Following my diagnosis and in setting up the business just over two years ago, I found the freedom to promote and utilize my natural talents at a pace and on a schedule that suited me. There have still been many challenges along the way and so for those, I am able to seek support without feeling a level of shame and inadequacy that existed before.

4) All Things Sensory and Fidgety

Founder Cait says: My business is making affordable sensory boxes and selling sensory toys at prices that everyone can afford. I work in my bedroom and the money is going towards me completing college.

Do you know any other businesses that are run by people with autism? Feel free to tag them in the comments. Let’s support small businesses.

Getty image by Piksel.