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When You’re Diagnosed With a Personality Disorder You’ve Never Even Heard Of

In 2019, I went to a psychiatric hospital after battling suicidal thoughts, abusing my anxiety meds and hitting a low I didn’t know was possible.

For six weeks, I was away from my family, which is almost as painful as fighting depression and anxiety. While I was there, I was assigned a psychiatrist, social worker, therapist and a psychologist. I underwent many psychiatric tests and was taken off all my psychiatric medications. It was rough. I knew I had major depressive disorder (MDD) because I’ve struggled with depression for almost two decades. I knew I had anxiety because of the debilitating panic attacks and intrusive thoughts — thoughts telling me I should kill myself or that my family was going to die.

What I wasn’t prepared for was the diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder (AvPD).

I had never even heard of it. Avoidant personality disorder, which affects about 1.5 to 2.5% of the general population, is described as having feelings of extreme social inhibition, inadequacy and sensitivity to negative criticism or rejection. It’s more than being shy or awkward in social situations (which I am). It makes it hard for those struggling with the disorder to interact with others and maintain relationships. It’s also common for “us” to avoid work or school, mostly because of extreme low self-esteem.

It was hard hearing this new diagnosis. For one, I already felt saddled by depression and anxiety. I wasn’t fond of the idea that I had this disorder, another albatross around my neck. And yet, I couldn’t deny it. Reading about the disorder was like reading from my memoir; I knew the symptoms and behavior well. I’ve always been socially awkward. I avoided school like the plague, and later when I worked, I avoided that, too. I haven’t worked outside the home since 2013. There was no denying the diagnosis. And, even though I’d probably been dealing with it since adolescence, I felt more broken because my many flaws were well-documented and it was “official.”

But that’s bullshit. I was broken, but not because of the diagnosis. I was broken because I had kept my struggles to myself and hadn’t reached out until it was almost too late. I was stifled by the stigma that surrounds depression and other mental disorders. The stigma and keeping my struggles to myself almost killed me. Having depression, anxiety, a personality disorder and binge eating disorder is nothing to be ashamed of. That’s what I have, not who I am.

Now, I blog about my troubles and speak freely to others about anything and everything mental health-related. I’m no longer afraid of being judged. The weight of others’ opinions is far too heavy to bear. Now, I’m free.

Reject the stigma. Be proud of the fighter that you are. Seek help if you need it. By doing so, we help eradicate the judgment and stigma. Be free with me.

Photo by Maia Habegger on Unsplash