Mania

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    The feeling of mania coming on.

    I can feel the changes in my body.

    Post

    Don’t Quit Your Daydream

    I have always been transparent about my life. From my struggles with depression as a tween, to my bipolar as a teen, and now my battles with lupus and mania as an adult.

    I have never hidden behind masks because I believe speaking openly and candidly can save lives if done with care.

    Lately, I’ve been feeling relatively happy- I am truly living my daydream. Yes, I have my medical complications and I have to go to the hospital on Monday for cancer screenings and I’m worried sick.

    But I’m trying to stay with a positive attitude and and a grateful heart. I have my dream job, good health care, a good routine, and a solid support system.

    Nothing can be 100% all the time and if you keep waiting for forever… forever will never come.

    Seize the day. There is no day but today.

    I’m proud of how far I’ve come, and yes, I’m scared as hell, but God’s got this.

    “Don’t quit your day dream, it ain’t big enough if it doesn’t scare the hell out of you”.

    #BipolarDisorder #Bipolar1Disorder #Bipolar2Disorder #ImposterSyndrome #BipolarDepression #ChronicDepression

    Post

    What Speech Reveals About Mental Illness

    What you say says a lot about you. How you say it matters too. You can take a simple sentence and change its meaning just by how you pitch your voice and what words you emphasize.

    Try it: Say the sentence, “I want you to love me.” Emphasize the “I” and you’re saying, “I, as opposed to anyone else.” Emphasize “want” and you mean “I want it, even if you don’t believe it.” If you come down hard on “love,” you mean “I want love, not friendship.” An emphasis on “me” translates to “I want you to love me, not that other person.” It works for nearly any sentence: “Please close the door.” “You have my attention.” “Why don’t you care about me?” We translate these meanings naturally and internally, without really thinking about them.

    Changes in language can certainly be revealing. In fact, there are several different kinds of speech that have a role in mental illness. They can be indicative of a certain kind of mental illness or of the way that a person is feeling. They can be used in diagnosis. They can be a way to better understand what a friend or loved one is going through.

    Pressured speech

    Pressured speech means that words seem to just tumble out, without much thought as to what is being said. The words come quickly, packed together like little freight trains of meaning that will zoom by if you don’t pay attention. Listening to pressured speech can be both confusing and overwhelming, difficult to understand.

    Pressured speech is common in bipolar disorder, especially in manic episodes. People who are experiencing mania feel a compelling, urgent need to share thoughts, ideas, comments, or emotions. They don’t wait for replies, as one would in a normal conversation. They can also speak inappropriately loudly or at inappropriate times, such as in church or during a lecture or concert. Pressured speech can last for an hour at a time or even longer.

    Because they are speaking so fast, people with pressured speech may even have difficulty expressing their own thoughts. There can be a lack of a clear thought process in what the manic person is saying, as they may talk about many things that don’t connect to each other. Their speech may include jokes or rhymes, song lyrics, and such.

    It does no good to ask a person with pressured speech to slow down or stop talking. They may feel like they must keep talking, as if they can’t stop.

    While pressured speech is most often associated with the mania or hypomania of bipolar disorder, it can also happen with schizoaffective disorder, autism, psychosis, ADHD, or an anxiety disorder.

    Flat affect/emotional blunting

    Flat affect means that you’re not demonstrating much of an emotional reaction to a situation. Inside, you may feel happy, for example, but it doesn’t show on your face or in your speech. The inside and the outside don’t match.

    Emotional blunting is a little different from flat affect, though. With emotional blunting, you don’t feel an emotion internally at all. You might not feel at all interested in a book or a movie that once gave you pleasure or laughter, for example. This results in flat, unemotional, dull speech patterns.

    Flat affect and emotional blunting are in some ways the opposite of pressured speech. They may occur when a person is depressed, in shock, or suffering from PTSD or other conditions. It’s a symptom of some illnesses, but not an illness in itself.

    Read the full story here: bipolarme.blog/2022/11/13/what-speech-reveals

    Post
    See full photo

    Hi, I'm Jenn... So glad to have found this!!!!

    Hello... I am new here... KrazeeBootiful80... That's ME!
    I'm 41 and was misdiagnosed at 17 as manic depressive bipolar. At 30 I was rediagnosed with BPD... My daddy diagnosed me at 15 when he would call me Katie Kaboom from the cartoons we watched as kids, Tiny Toons if I am not mistaken. ("We're tiny, we're tooney, we're all a little looney...") I am so thankful for this site/app!!! Thanks so much to the creators!!!! God bless you!!! #Crazy #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder #BPDDiagnosis #ThankYou #feelalone

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    Climbing Out Of Depression-Getting Better

    Thank you all for your words of encouragement. I really appreciate them, they lifted my spirits. I am feeling much better. Like the depression is lifting. I just hope I don't go into a manic episode. I am thankful for having a wonderful support system like this and my family. Combined with your encouragement and lifestyle changes I overcame the darkest part of the depression. Thank you all again. Healing is possible and the PTSD didn't get triggered today:) I'm sharing this to let you know that you can come out of your darkest times. Keep shining:) Also much love to my fiancé.

    #BipolarDisorder #happy #thankful #Blessed #PTSD #Abuse #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder #Love #Inspiration

    Post

    Advice: Supersembarrased. How do I face my in-laws?

    I am at a particularly low place and recovering from a manic episode. My in-laws will be here this weekend and I recently found out they know everything about my worst manic episode (the one that got me diagnosed 7 years ago). I am going to have a lot of time with them for conversation. How do I look them in the face and not see everything I did playing in the back of their minds? I am mortified embarrassed. What would you do? #Bipolar1Disorder #ComplexPosttraumaticStressDisorder #newhere

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    Breathing slowly

    Can not breathe but no one is chocking me

    Can not sleep, but no one is making a noise

    Do not want to accept, even if it is the truth

    Do not want to be reminded , even if I forgot

    Has never been easy, I wish those memories were long gone

    But I need to be kind to myself and move on

    #Bipolar1Disorder #Love #Shame #Mania #Anxiety #Sadness #Guilty #black #MightyPoets

    Post

    Might be some hope/motivation for some? (long post)

    Hey all,

    I went out with some friends on Friday and it was super fun. One of my best friends said to me just to look back to where I was like 2-4 years ago and look at myself now.

    4 years ago:

    Just come out of the hospital that I was forced to stay in for 8 months

    homeless then living with parents on the sofa

    no job little prospects for a job and looking like a lifetime of disability

    all my friends had stopped speaking to me for one reason or another. Mainly due to how unwell I was

    drug/alcohol addict

    extremely overweight and unable to stop gaining weight (Paliperidone/Invega)

    Sleeping 16 hours a day

    Now:

    Steady job and just got a promotion. WFH 4/5 days and 1 day in the office

    Buying my own flat

    Found the perfect medication combo

    Smoke weed once every 2-3 months and drink only on weekends socially

    Better sleep pattern and generally sleep ok

    Friends with most of my old friends now I am better, got a whole load of new close friends

    Lost a lot of weight though I still have some ways to go

    No hospital visits since last time (and to continue God willing)

    What didn't change:

    My illness

    My hallucinations

    My mood episodes

    What helped:

    Right medication, I am on a very little dose of antipsychotics and a very high dose of antidepressants. There are pros and cons for this. The biggest pros for me are avoiding weight gain and not being on the brink of suicidal 24/7. I still have down days and am quite depressed a lot but it is not the point of hopeless overwhelming depression. The hallucinations are a constant that I have done psychology to deal with. This is more about my reaction and the way I deal with hallucinations, would 100% recommend it super helpful.

    I still deal with super manic episodes, but my friends are aware and I have had a sit-down chat with my friends about how I am, my illness, warning signs, and just how to deal with it. We have an agreement that if I am too unwell they will say this to me and distance themselves for their own sakes until I am better.

    My job is aware of my illness on an hr level. My managers are aware, though I don't think they understand too much. I am even the accessibility "go-to guy" at work and am really proud of my efforts for accessibility within my job role.

    My family - they have supported me 100% though I feel guilty so much about how I treated them at times when I was unwell.

    If you read this post thank you and I hope it helped, it sure helped me to write it. Feel free to ask questions :)

    Post

    Might be some hope/motivation for some? (long post)

    Hey all,

    I went out with some friends on Friday and it was super fun. One of my best friends said to me just to look back to where I was like 2-4 years ago and look at myself now.

    4 years ago:

    Just come out of the hospital that I was forced to stay in for 8 months

    homeless then living with parents on the sofa

    no job little prospects for a job and looking like a lifetime of disability

    all my friends had stopped speaking to me for one reason or another. Mainly due to how unwell I was

    drug/alcohol addict

    extremely overweight and unable to stop gaining weight (Paliperidone/Invega)

    Sleeping 16 hours a day

    Now:

    Steady job and just got a promotion. WFH 4/5 days and 1 day in the office

    Buying my own flat

    Found the perfect medication combo

    Smoke weed once every 2-3 months and drink only on weekends socially

    Better sleep pattern and generally sleep ok

    Friends with most of my old friends now I am better, got a whole load of new close friends

    Lost a lot of weight though I still have some ways to go

    No hospital visits since last time (and to continue God willing)

    What didn't change:

    My illness

    My hallucinations

    My mood episodes

    What helped:

    Right medication, I am on a very little dose of antipsychotics and a very high dose of antidepressants. There are pros and cons for this. The biggest pros for me are avoiding weight gain and not being on the brink of suicidal 24/7. I still have down days and am quite depressed a lot but it is not the point of hopeless overwhelming depression. The hallucinations are a constant that I have done psychology to deal with. This is more about my reaction and the way I deal with hallucinations, would 100% recommend it super helpful.

    I still deal with super manic episodes, but my friends are aware and I have had a sit-down chat with my friends about how I am, my illness, warning signs, and just how to deal with it. We have an agreement that if I am too unwell they will say this to me and distance themselves for their own sakes until I am better.

    My job is aware of my illness on an hr level. My managers are aware, though I don't think they understand too much. I am even the accessibility "go-to guy" at work and am really proud of my efforts for accessibility within my job role.

    My family - they have supported me 100% though I feel guilty so much about how I treated them at times when I was unwell.

    If you read this post thank you and I hope it helped, it sure helped me to write it. Feel free to ask questions :)

    #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder

    Post

    Still Going-Even With Depression

    Not sure how long this episode is going to last but a combination of things have really helped. One of those things being a change in outlook. I no longer look at my depressed #BipolarDisorder episodes as hopeless like I used to. They are more manageable because I changed my outlook. I am not saying that it doesn't get to me some days, some days are harder than others. But I manage to remain thankful. Also lifestyle and diet changes help a lot. Lemon water is a natural mood booster and ever since I've been drinking it I've been happier. Not like mania happy but just happy in general. I highly suggest drinking lemon water if you want to get healthy or to experience its mental health benefits. Having coping strategies also helps. I use writing as my main outlet (as you can see) but for some people it may be something else. Especially with having #PTSD it's important to have a go to coping mechanism. But even when my #PTSD isn't acting up I use writing as a way to unwind. I'm not sure what I use for #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder but I suppose that because it has a lot to do with self-perception that I can start on that. So as you can see, all these factors help to get me through. Today I am thankful for the ability to share my journey with others. What has helped you to cope?

    #BipolarDisorder #Depression #PTSD #Abuse #abusesurvivor #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder #thankful #Blessed #Hope #Inspiration #Striving #thriving #strength #Writing #coping #Lifestlye