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    Remedying imposter syndrome

    Imposter syndrome can cause you to feel insecure, burned out, and full of self-doubt. If you struggle with imposter syndrome then check out this week's podcast episode to learn different ways you can remedy imposter syndrome such as Dr. Emee's TLC questioning sequence.

    accordingtodes.com/115

    #Imposter #ImposterSyndrome #challengingthoughts #mentalhealthpodcast #podcastepisode

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    How to recognize and remedy imposter syndrome

    Imposter syndrome is the persistent feeling of self-doubt despite competence and qualifications. People who struggle with imposter syndrome tend to overwork and stretch themselves too thin to overcompensate for self-doubt. Dr. Emee, an imposter syndrome researcher, explains that this often leads to burnout which can cause physical, mental, and psychological health issues as well as social issues. If you struggle with imposter syndrome then you don’t want to miss this podcast episode.

    accordingtodes.com/115-2

    #ImposterSyndrome #SelfDoubt #Burnout #overcomingimpostersyndrome #Insecure #mentalwellness

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    What is imposter syndrome?

    #ImposterSyndrome

    Impostor syndrome, also known as impostor phenomenon or impostorism, is a psychological occurrence in which an individual doubts their skills, talents, or accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a fraud. Despite external evidence of their competence, those experiencing this phenomenon do not believe they deserve their success or luck. They may incorrectly attribute it to the Matthew effect, or they may think that they are deceiving others because they feel as if they are not as intelligent as they outwardly portray themselves to be.

    Impostor syndrome can stem from and result in strained personal relationships and can hinder individuals from achieving their full potential in their fields of interest.

    When impostor syndrome was first conceptualized, it was viewed as a phenomenon that was common among high-achieving women. Further research has shown that it affects both men and women, in the collective sense that the proportion affected are more or less equally distributed among the genders.

    Individuals with impostor syndrome often have corresponding mental health issues, which may be treated with psychological interventions, though the phenomenon is not a formal mental disorder.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/overcoming-imposter-syndrome

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    Do you not let your light shine due to imposter syndrome?

    Good Monday morning, my friends! Welcome to another week and another question from the incomparable Maya Lorde:

    Do you not let your light shine due to imposter syndrome?

    Imposter syndrome can be defined as a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success.

    My PTSD has led me to fear expressing my talents. I fear someone is going to find me out, that I am not competent or capable, and expose me for the fraud I am. Even though there is ample evidence that I am skilled and capable of whatever I choose to do.

    When I feel scared and unsure of myself, I hum the song “This Little Light of Mine.” You are competent and capable and can do big and small things. Do not fear the old messages in your head that are holding you back.

    How are you going to let your light shine? What skill do you have that you are proud of? What do you do to help yourself quiet the negative voices?

    #Trauma #CPTSD #PTSD #ImposterSyndrome

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    Stop thinking like an imposter using 10 steps

    #ImposterSyndrome

    Break the silence. Shame keeps a lot of people from “fessing up” about their fraudulent feelings. Knowing there’s a name for these feelings and that you are not alone can be tremendously freeing.

    Separate feelings from fact. There are times you’ll feel stupid. It happens to everyone from time to time. Realize that just because you may feel stupid, doesn’t mean you are.

    Recognize when you should feel fraudulent. A sense of belonging fosters confidence. If you’re the only or one of a few people in a meeting, classroom, field, or workplace who look or sound like you or are much older or younger, then it’s only natural you’d sometimes feel like you don’t totally fit in. Plus if you’re the first woman, people of color, or person with a disability to achieve something in your world, e.g. first VP, astronaut, judge, supervisor, firefighter, honoree, etc. there’s that added pressure to represent your entire group. Instead of taking your self-doubt as a sign of your ineptness, recognize that it might be a normal response to being on the receiving end of social stereotypes about competence and intelligence.

    Accentuate the positive. The good news is being a perfectionist means you care deeply about the quality of your work. The key is to continue to strive for excellence when it matters most, but don’t persevere over routine tasks and forgive yourself when the inevitable mistake happens.

    Develop a healthy response to failure and mistake making. Henry Ford once said, “Failure is only the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.” Instead of beating yourself up for falling short, do what players on the losing sports team do and glean the learning value from the loss and move on reminding yourself, “I’ll get ’em next time.”

    Right the rules. If you’ve been operating under misguided rules like, “I should always know the answer,” or “Never ask for help” start asserting your rights. Recognize that you have just as much right as the next person to be wrong, have an off-day, or ask for assistance.

    Develop a new script. Become consciously aware of the conversation going on in your head when you’re in a situation that triggers your Impostor feelings. This is your internal script. Then instead of thinking, “Wait till they find out I have no idea what I’m doing,” tell yourself “Everyone who starts something new feels off-base in the beginning. I may not know all the answers but I’m smart enough to find them out.” Instead of looking around the room and thinking, “Oh my God everyone here is brilliant…. and I’m not” go with “Wow, everyone here is brilliant – I’m really going to learn a lot!”

    Visualize success. Do what professional athletes do. Spend time beforehand picturing yourself making a successful presentation or calmly posing your question in class. It sure beats picturing impending disaster and will help with performance-related stress.

    Reward yourself. Break the cycle of continually seeking — and then dismissing — validation outside of yourself by learning to pat yourself on the back.

    Fake it ‘til you make it. Now and then we all have to fly by the seat of our pants. Instead of considering “winging it” as proof of your ineptness, learn to do what many high achievers do and view it as a skill. The point of the worn-out phrase, fake it til you make it, still stands: Don’t wait until you feel confident to start putting yourself out there. Courage comes from taking risks. Change your behavior first and allow your confidence to build.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/overcoming-imposter-syndrome

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    Strategies for overcoming imposter syndrome

    #ImposterSyndrome

    Imposter syndrome is used to describe a mindset in which individuals hold a strong belief that they are defrauding others despite their real-life accomplishments. People who battle this syndrome tend to be conflicted between others’ perception that they are valuable and their own opinion that they are inadequate. As such, self-perceived imposters are likely to credit any personal success to external variants like coincidence or luck rather than to their own merits.

    Those with imposter syndrome are virtually incapable of embracing their achievements and persistently worry that they won’t be able to reproduce prior accomplishments, breeding a negative cycle of anxiety, guilt, and feelings worthless.1,2,3,4,5 This dysfunctional thinking pattern can impact anyone, regardless of gender, age, social status, work history, skill level, or degree of expertise.

    Signs of imposter syndrome may include:

    -Feeling deceitful or fraudulent

    -Anxiety associated with being exposed as an imposter

    -Inability to accurately assess personal competencies

    -Disregard or underestimation of abilities and accomplishments

    -Guilt and shame regarding success

    -Self-sabotaging behaviors that limit personal, professional, or academic growth

    -Fear of failure and fear of success

    -Deep sense of unworthiness and ongoing self-doubt

    -Persistent belief that others overestimate one’s abilities and knowledge

    -Perfectionistic traits that trigger overworking and work burnout

    -Extremely self-critical and tendency to overemphasize personal mistakes

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/overcoming-imposter-syndrome

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    Imposter syndrome- impact

    #ImposterSyndrome

    Impostor syndrome, also known as impostor phenomenon or impostorism, is a psychological occurrence in which an individual doubts their skills, talents, or accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a fraud. Despite external evidence of their competence, those experiencing this phenomenon do not believe they deserve their success or luck. They may incorrectly attribute it to the Matthew effect, or they may think that they are deceiving others because they feel as if they are not as intelligent as they outwardly portray themselves to be.

    Impostor syndrome can stem from and result in strained personal relationships and can hinder individuals from achieving their full potential in their fields of interest.

    When impostor syndrome was first conceptualized, it was viewed as a phenomenon that was common among high-achieving women. Further research has shown that it affects both men and women, in the collective sense that the proportion affected are more or less equally distributed among the genders. Individuals with impostor syndrome often have corresponding mental health issues, which may be treated with psychological interventions, though the phenomenon is not a formal mental disorder.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/overcoming-imposter-syndrome

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    The Imposter Cycle

    #ImposterSyndrome

    This model is useful, as it presents multiple points to intervene and break the cycle. Presented below are some strategies for counteracting the imposter syndrome along various points of this model.

    Reframe the task. If facing an achievement-related task prompts anxiety, self-doubt and worry, you might try to reappraise or reframe the task itself as an opportunity to learn, as opposed to an occasion for proving yourself. You’ve already earned your spot, your only task now is to grow through the challenging tasks you face. Remember, graduate school is meant to be difficult. You are not supposed to know everything at the start (or the end). As much as possible, try to face difficult tasks with curiosity.

    Work smart. Anxiety, worry and self-doubt can prompt procrastination, over-preparation or both. If you find yourself procrastinating on challenging or threatening tasks, try to reach out instead of turning inwards. Find a peer who is also facing a challenging task and schedule time to work together. In doing so, you’ll be held accountable for working on the task, and will likely be comforted to know that others around you are feeling similarly about their tasks. If you tend to over-prepare, try to calibrate your efforts — especially if your effort is coming at the expense of your sleep or leisure time. There is definitely a place for going above and beyond but give yourself permission to not do so always.

    Feel the relief and take ownership. When you accomplish a difficult task, allow yourself to feel relief, pride or growth. If you’re attributing your success to luck, reflect on the work that you did to get there. Make a list of the actions you took. If you receive positive feedback, take it in. Your peers/instructors/advisors are not lying to you to make you feel better — they think you have done good work and deserve to feel good about it.

    Seek out tasks that you are good at. While there is certainly a place for challenging, novel tasks, you should also seek out tasks that you enjoy and are good at. If you are good at stats, offer to run analyses for your projects. If you enjoy reading, offer to conduct a literature review for the introduction of a paper. If you are a skilled writer, offer to draft or edit. Contributing your skills is affirming.

    Seek support. Remember, many people have experienced the imposter syndrome at some point — you are not alone. Seek out the support of your peers or mentors. They can offer you affirmation that you belong and can offer insight into how they’ve dealt with similar experiences. To move past feelings of the imposter syndrome, it can be tremendously helpful to have peers and friends who are supportive and open about their challenges. They can help you find new strategies to overcome self-doubt, develop your abilities and discover new strengths.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/overcoming-imposter-syndrome

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