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    Perfect Being

    During my processing today I tapped into a thought that became a loving mantra in my head, much like hearing Robin Williams saying "It's not your fault"

    I am a perfect being

    There's nothing 'wrong' with me.
    I'm a pure child of the universe (my version of Higher Power)
    I didn't deserve the manipulations and trauma.
    I didn't deserve the terror
    My intentions have always been well meaning, they still are.
    I AM a PERFECT Being

    It's the Human part I'm struggling with

    #EmotionalAbuse #PTSD #EmotionalNeglect #delayed development due to neglect and abuse

    12 reactions 24 comments
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    #Childhoodtrauma Memories: Navigating Healing as an Adult

    Sometimes the memories of the abuse I experienced as a child come up unexpectedly. I become so focused on the abuse I experienced as an adult (though it was a continuation of the child abuse) that I neglect the fact that I experienced abuse as a child. More recently, I began to have memories of the little things that made me feel unsafe and insecure. As an adult I was sexually assaulted but as a child I was sexually abused by a family member. I no longer have distressing vivid flashbacks but I do have thoughts of what happened. These thoughts bring up emotions that I thought I dealt with.

    I have been in therapy for a couple years now and while I have done a lot of healing I still struggle with healing my inner child. Perhaps by addressing my childhood emotions and memories I can create a clearer path towards healing as an adult. Addressing my childhood trauma and just saying that out loud makes me sad.

    I am lucky to have my support system. The more these memories and feelings come up and the more I work through them the more I can accept certain aspects. I'll admit that I struggle with wanting closure and answers. Maybe that is my inner child looking for help. Having a support network that understands my trauma has helped tremendously. The more I can acknowledge my childhood trauma and the types of abuse I experienced the more I can move forward.

    Being a survivor of both #SexualAbuse and #EmotionalAbuse has taken a toll on me as well as having various mental health conditions including #PTSD . Does anyone have any tips on addressing childhood trauma? No one wants to hear that a child was being abused but the fact is, it does happen. It happens a lot. Sometimes in families. I love my family because they have been with me through most of my healing journey and they accept me. They don't treat my differently because I was abused. With their help I can overcome anything. For this I am grateful.

    My hope is that one day my childhood trauma won't effect me as much as it does now. I am no longer an abused child but a strong and capable adult. Thank you to everyone that has supported me both on and off of this site. Just being acknowledged and believed is instrumental in my healing journey. While I still struggle with the effects of the abuse such as low self esteem and over apologizing. One day I know that I will reach my goals. You can reach yours too. I believe in you. Thank you for believing in me and for replying to my post. It means a lot. It shows me that I am not alone on my journey. We are here to help, listen to and support each other.

    I am inspired by each of your stories and I hope you are inspired by mine. Together we will overcome!

    #ChildhoodAbuse

    6 reactions 1 comment
    Post

    I’m new here!

    Hi, my name is LadyLee. I'm here because I have recently started therapy to deal with the abuse and neglect I’ve suffered.

    #MightyTogether #Anxiety #Depression #PTSD #Fibromyalgia

    19 reactions 6 comments
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    Newly Diagnosed

    Hi, I am newly diagnosed with fibromyalgia, my doctor had a suspicion of it, sent me for some testing to rule other reasons for my pain out. I am looking for any suggestions for managing it, especially something you wish you had learned sooner. I have almost every symptom on the list it seems but never had anyone take it seriously before this one doctor came into my life. And it took her more than 3 years to really get to the bottom of it, granted a lot of my problems were masked by other issues in life, but she worked and is still working relentlessly with me to improve my quality of life. I work full time in health care but tend to neglect my own health. I would love to make a friend or two online to talk about this stuff with.
    #Fibromyalgia

    52 reactions 25 comments
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    Please help me

    I can’t understand why I neglect myself. I should take my medication because without them TW!! I get suicidal thoughts. And please don’t comment mean things. I’m just describing you just the way it is, I’m not here to start a debate on anti depressants. They work for me which I’m so thankful for. The issue is me, I neglect my own needs, I can’t shower, I don’t brush my teeth, I can’t clean my house, I don’t take my medication. The only things i have energy for is other people because im a people pleaser. What the hell is wrong with me? Even when I take my anti depressants I neglect myself, the only difference is I feel way less worse than I do without them. I feel like a failure. Please someone help me. #Depression #MajorDepression #Anxiety #help

    59 reactions 27 comments
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    Remembering to take meds

    OK, so I need various psych meds but have realized that, over the months, I inadvertently don't take them on something like 40% or 45% of days! I keep the bottles right where I work most of the day; I have a reminder sign; I keep a little list to check off the daily box when I remember to take the meds. I've tried those pill organizers with the days of the week on little compartments; but I'm still missing nearly half the time. I don't live with anybody who can remind me. Just wondering if there are other methods of remembering. Maybe I should look for a phone app. I guess I'd like something visible and tactile... Any practical ideas? Any insights or reflections on missing doses? (I've read that Americans are best at giving meds to their pets; less good at remembering to give meds to our kids; and worst at taking our own meds. It's not unusual for adults to throw out prescriptions for themselves, without even getting them filled. Some say it's that, at a level below normal awareness, we neglect caring for ourselves because we know our faults; we're more forgiving or understanding of kids and pets!)

    1 comment
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    #CPTSD Needs your voice.

    It was only in 2018 that I discovered I struggled with CPTSD. Most of my adult life I believed I was reacting to my mother's physical abuse. The idea that childhood emotional neglect is equally--if not more--damaging floored me. Really? Is the thing that I've been fighting my entire adult life actually... invisible?

    I have posted here about finding new language for CPTSD as it is so unrecognized that it's near impossible to talk about. So many other "mental illness" conditions spring from Complex PTSD--often developed from longterm childhood impacts. Traumatologist John Briere suggests, "“If the role of dysfunctional parenting in adult psychological disorders was ever fully recognized as CPTSD, The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (used by all mental health professionals) would shrink from a large dictionary to a thin pamphlet.”

    Let that sink in for a minute.

    Some survivors have suggested they would never talk about it--perhaps because it's too painful, that no one understands anyway or that it's private. I urge you to consider this:

    --As a child of the 80s-90s, the LGBTQ community was not largely recognized. Many of these people hid their identities for fear of ridicule, inability for loved ones to understand and accept their reality and the world did not have a language for talking about and recognizing them. We do now.

    --Drug and alcohol abuse is an intensely personal and private journey stemming from issues that are not understandable or visible just by looking at the symptoms of addiction. There is an AA meeting in just about, if not every, city in America. There is community, support and a language for sufferers to gather. We need this.

    --Cancer is a topic we put on stage--in national fundraisers, community and workplace support groups with physical products and symbols we can wear to show support. This is an intensely private journey that, if you do not have it, you may not be able to full understand. And yet people of all walks of life--with or without the illness--talk about it. We need this.

    These are just three examples of how it's possible to turn a neglected, unknown and invisible topic into a world where it's okay to suffer from CPTSD--and still belong, and still feel seen and have the tools to have dialogue that can help you.

    I encourage anyone who is on their journey to discovering, working on and healing from Complex PTSD to use your voice for all of us.

    #ComplexCPTSD #CPTSD #Childhood #Trauma #Childhoodemotionalneglect #CEN #complexposttraumaticstressdisorder

    19 reactions 5 comments
    Post

    #CPTSD Needs your voice.

    It was only in 2018 that I discovered I struggled with CPTSD. Most of my adult life I believed I was reacting to my mother's physical abuse. The idea that childhood emotional neglect is equally--if not more--damaging floored me. Really? Is the thing that I've been fighting my entire adult life actually... invisible?

    I have posted here about finding new language for CPTSD as it is so unrecognized that it's near impossible to talk about. So many other "mental illness" conditions spring from Complex PTSD--often developed from longterm childhood impacts. Traumatologist John Briere suggests, "“If the role of dysfunctional parenting in adult psychological disorders was ever fully recognized as CPTSD, The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (used by all mental health professionals) would shrink from a large dictionary to a thin pamphlet.”

    Let that sink in for a minute.

    Some survivors have suggested they would never talk about it--perhaps because it's too painful, that no one understands anyway or that it's private. I urge you to consider this:

    --As a child of the 80s-90s, the LGBTQ community was not largely recognized. Many of these people hid their identities for fear of ridicule, inability for loved ones to understand and accept their reality and the world did not have a language for talking about and recognizing them. We do now.

    --Drug and alcohol abuse is an intensely personal and private journey stemming from issues that are not understandable or visible just by looking at the symptoms of addiction. There is an AA meeting in just about, if not every, city in America. There is community, support and a language for sufferers to gather. We need this.

    --Cancer is a topic we put on stage--in national fundraisers, community and workplace support groups with physical products and symbols we can wear to show support. This is an intensely private journey that, if you do not have it, you may not be able to full understand. And yet people of all walks of life--with or without the illness--talk about it. We need this.

    These are just three examples of how it's possible to turn a neglected, unknown and invisible topic into a world where it's okay to suffer from CPTSD--and still belong, and still feel seen and have the tools to have dialogue that can help you.

    I encourage anyone who is on their journey to discovering, working on and healing from Complex PTSD to use your voice for all of us.

    #ComplexCPTSD #CPTSD #Childhood #Trauma #Childhoodemotionalneglect #CEN #complexposttraumaticstressdisorder

    7 reactions 4 comments
    Post

    Taking Life, One Stride at a Time

    Part 1 of 2 As a new parent, there are few things that could scare you more than hearing that your infant had a stroke. These are five words no parent wants to hear. On May 26th, 2001, two days after I was born, my parents received the news that I had a neonatal stroke. According to John Hopkins Medicine, pediatric stroke is a rare condition that affects one in every 4,000 newborns and 2,000 older children each year. Today, I am thankful the effects of my stroke are not as severe as they could have been, but I did not always feel that way.

    My neonatal stroke was on the right side of my brain which affects my left arm and leg. I was born premature via cesarean section after having a low heart rate and my umbilical cord being wrapped around my neck. I spent six weeks in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Rush University Medical Center. My initial diagnosis was left hemiplegia, which is a form of cerebral palsy affecting the left half of my body. My parents were unsure of what to expect in the future until I struggled to meet certain milestones like pulling myself up or walking unassisted. I had my first and only seizure when I was three years old.

    My parents have supported me through so many difficult times, like when I used to cry from pain when I received Botox injections to treat the tightness in my arm. They held my hand when I was still wearing braces until I began middle school and was extremely scared of the saw used to cut off the molds for my braces. They took it one step at a time, because that is all they could do after their daughter was diagnosed with an adult-associated diagnosis.

    Personally, I will never know what it is like to have two fully functioning arms and legs, because I only know what life is like with a permanent disability. As a result, I have never learned how to complete tasks bilaterally, even after about 12 years of either occupational or physical therapy. I was a stubborn child, so my parents and medical team had to convince me to do my exercises to strengthen my extremities and to wear my braces. As an elementary and middle schooler, I became aware of how different I was from my classmates, because I was the kid who wore braces and left class to receive in-school physical and occupational therapy a few days a week. I wanted to do more than just go to occupational and physical therapy after school. At times, this made it difficult to make close friends until I was in college.

    In addition to difficulty with bilateral fine-motor tasks, I was closely monitored for signs of visual neglect on my left side as I got older. As a result of my stroke, I have a permanant visual impairment called Left Homonymous Hemianopia. In the simplest language, that means I am unable to see out of the left side of both eyes, so about 50% of my vision is gone. This was one of the hardest and most emotional diagnoses I have dealt with, because I was diagnosed while in high school at the age of 16. Then, I was told I would be unable to legally drive, because I do not meet the visual requirements for most states. I remember being in shock that day. My neuro-ophthalmologist explained to me that my eyes were perfectly healthy with 20/20 vision, but I had brain damage and there would not be anything we could do to fix it. Since receiving this life changing diagnosis, I have battled anxiety and depression. At the time of my diagnosis, I was a junior in high school running competitive cross country and track and field. So many things ran through my head that day about what the future would hold with so many unknowns and wondering whether I would still be able to run.

    With all my diagnoses post-stroke, I could focus on being sad about what I might not be able to do or be thankful for the abilities God has given me and all that I have overcome so far. Now, I am a senior in college, studying Health Communication with a minor in Psychology. I have been able to excel academically after being told by various educators I was not smart enough to take higher level classes or when I was older that I was faking my mostly invisible disability. Today, I am grateful my parents encouraged me to participate in cross country in 5th grade, a sport where my disability did not affect my ability to compete with my teammates as other sports did. 12 years later, I would never have dreamed that I would have had so much success in running, especially at the collegiate level, and be able to compete for two different colleges. Now, I can say that I won a team National Championship for Cross Country and am an individual All-American. I was finally able to fulfill my dreams of going away to college for my junior year after earning my associates degree, although I knew it would be a scary transition and difficult adjustment. After graduating with my bachelor’s degree, I hope to work for an organization like the American H

    9 reactions 3 comments