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I'm new here!

Hi, my name is Healing2024. I'm here because I'm trying to recover from a frightening narcissistic work relationship.

#MightyTogether

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Surreal

I still can't believe a girl like her would want a guy like me. She's incredible. So considerate of my needs and feelings. So supportive and encouraging. She's there for me on my rough days. She celebrates my good days. She takes an interest in the things that I enjoy. And I've been just as supportive of her. I absolutely love her in a new way that I have never felt before. It's long distance so there's no pressure for a physical relationship. I'm free to express myself and she accepts me just as I am. She's amazing. I'm such a lucky guy.

#CheerMeOn

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Middle-Grade Books Featuring Protagonists With Autism

Autism is not “one size fits all”. So here are a few middle-grade books featuring protagonists with autism, in hopes that at least one book will be relatable.

1. “Rules” by Cynthia Lord
Twelve-year-old Catherine just wants a normal life. Which is near impossible when you have a brother with autism and a family that revolves around his disability. She's spent years trying to teach David the rules—from "a peach is not a funny-looking apple" to "keep your pants on in public"—in order to stop his embarrassing behaviors. But the summer Catherine meets Jason, a paraplegic boy, and Kristi, the next-door friend she's always wished for, it's her own shocking behavior that turns everything upside down and forces her to ask: “What is normal?”

2. “Chester and Gus” by Cammie McGovern
Chester has always wanted to become a service dog. When he fails his certification test, though, it seems like that dream might never come true—until a family adopts him to be a companion for their ten-year-old son, Gus, who has autism. But Gus acts so differently than anyone Chester has ever met. He never wants to pet Chester, and sometimes he doesn’t even want him in the room. Chester’s not sure how to help Gus since this isn’t exactly the job he trained for—but he’s determined to figure it out and show he’s the right dog for the job. Because after all, Gus is now his person.

3. ”Rain Reign” by Ann M. Martin
Rose Howard has Asperger’s syndrome, and an obsession with homonyms (even her name is a homonym). She gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose’s rules of homonyms, is very special. Rain was a lost dog Rose’s father brought home. Rose and Rain are practically inseparable. And they are often home alone, as Rose’s father spends most evenings at a bar, and doesn’t have much patience for his “special-needs”daughter. Just as a storm hits town, Rain goes missing. Rose’s father shouldn’t have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search. Rose will find Rain, but so will Rain’s original owners.

4. “Mockingbird” by Kathryn Erskine
In Caitlin’s world, everything is black or white. Things are good or bad. Anything in between is confusing. That’s the stuff Caitlin’s older brother, Devon, has always explained. But now Devon’s dead and Dad is no help at all. Caitlin wants to get over it, but as an eleven-year-old girl with Asperger’s, she doesn’t know how. When she reads the definition of closure, she realizes that is what she needs. In her search for it, Caitlin discovers that not everything is black and white—the world is full of colors—messy and beautiful.

5. “Because of The Rabbit” by Cynthia Lord
On the last night of summer, Emma tags along with her game warden father on a routine call. They're supposed to rescue a wild rabbit from a picket fence, but instead they find a little bunny. Emma convinces her father to bring him home for the night. The next day, Emma starts public school for the very first time after years of being homeschooled. More than anything, Emma wants to make a best friend in school. But things don't go as planned. On the first day of school, she's paired with a boy named Jack for a project. He can't stay on topic, he speaks out of turn, and he's obsessed with animals. Jack doesn't fit in, and Emma's worried he'll make her stand out. Emma and Jack bond over her rescue rabbit. But will their new friendship keep Emma from finding the new best friend she's meant to have?

6. “Can You See Me?” by Libby Scott
Things Tally is dreading about sixth grade:
—Being in classes without her best friends
—New (scratchy) uniforms
—Hiding her autism
Tally isn't ashamed of being autistic—even if it complicates life sometimes, it's part of who she is. But this is her first year at Kingswood Academy, and her best friend, Layla, is the only one who knows. And while a lot of other people are uncomfortable around Tally, Layla has never been one of them . . . until now. Something is different about sixth grade, and Tally now feels like she has to act "normal." But as Tally hides her true self, she starts to wonder what "normal" means after all and whether fitting in is really what matters most. Inspired by young coauthor Libby Scott's own experiences with autism, this is an honest and moving middle-school story of friends, family, and finding one's place.

7. “Caterpillar Summer” by Gillian McDunn
Cat and her brother Chicken have always had a very special bond—Cat is one of the few people who can keep Chicken happy. When he has a "meltdown" she's the one who scratches his back and reads his favorite story. She's the one who knows what Chicken needs. Since their mom has had to work double-hard to keep their family afloat after their father passed away, Cat has been the glue holding her family together. But even the strongest glue sometimes struggles to hold. When a summer trip doesn't go according to plan, Cat and Chicken end up spending three weeks with grandparents they never knew. For the first time in years, Cat has the opportunity to be a kid again, and the journey she takes shows that even the most broken or strained relationships can be healed if people take the time to walk in one another's shoes.

8. “A Kind of Spark” by Elle McNicoll
A neurodivergent girl campaigns for a memorial when she learns that her small Scottish town used to burn witches simply because they were different.

No one experience with autism is “right” or “wrong”, it’s just personal.

📚 Happy reading! 💖

#themightyreaders #AutismSpectrumDisorder #AspergersSyndrome

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Middle-Grade Books Promoting Neurodiversity

YA books are great, but people need representation in every stage of life. Not only every stage of life, but in all walks of life. Neurodivergence is often ignored, especially for younger readers.

So here are some books promoting neurodiversity:

1.”Rules” by Cynthia Lord

Twelve-year-old Catherine just wants a normal life. Which is near impossible when you have a brother with autism and a family that revolves around his disability. She's spent years trying to teach David the rules—from "a peach is not a funny-looking apple" to "keep your pants on in public"—in order to stop his embarrassing behaviors. But the summer Catherine meets Jason, a paraplegic boy, and Kristi, the next-door friend she's always wished for, it's her own shocking behavior that turns everything upside down and forces her to ask: “What is normal?”

2.”Rain Reign” by Ann M. Martin

Rose Howard has Asperger’s syndrome, and an obsession with homonyms (even her name is a homonym). She gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose’s rules of homonyms, is very special. Rain was a lost dog Rose’s father brought home. Rose and Rain are practically inseparable. And they are often home alone, as Rose’s father spends most evenings at a bar, and doesn’t have much patience for his “special-needs”daughter. Just as a storm hits town, Rain goes missing. Rose’s father shouldn’t have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search. Rose will find Rain, but so will Rain’s original owners.

3.”Because of The Rabbit” by Cynthia Lord

On the last night of summer, Emma tags along with her game warden father on a routine call. They're supposed to rescue a wild rabbit from a picket fence, but instead they find a little bunny. Emma convinces her father to bring him home for the night. The next day, Emma starts public school for the very first time after years of being homeschooled. More than anything, Emma wants to make a best friend in school. But things don't go as planned. On the first day of school, she's paired with a boy named Jack for a project. He can't stay on topic, he speaks out of turn, and he's obsessed with animals. Jack doesn't fit in, and Emma's worried he'll make her stand out. Emma and Jack bond over her rescue rabbit. But will their new friendship keep Emma from finding the new best friend she's meant to have?

4.”Mockingbird” by Kathryn Erskine

In Caitlin’s world, everything is black or white. Things are good or bad. Anything in between is confusing. That’s the stuff Caitlin’s older brother, Devon, has always explained. But now Devon’s dead and Dad is no help at all. Caitlin wants to get over it, but as an eleven-year-old girl with Asperger’s, she doesn’t know how. When she reads the definition of closure, she realizes that is what she needs. In her search for it, Caitlin discovers that not everything is black and white—the world is full of colors—messy and beautiful.

5.“A Kind of Spark” by Elle McNicoll

A neurodivergent girl campaigns for a memorial when she learns that her small Scottish town used to burn witches simply because they were different.

6.”Caterpillar Summer” by Gillian McDunn

Cat and her brother Chicken have always had a very special bond—Cat is one of the few people who can keep Chicken happy. When he has a "meltdown" she's the one who scratches his back and reads his favorite story. She's the one who knows what Chicken needs. Since their mom has had to work double-hard to keep their family afloat after their father passed away, Cat has been the glue holding her family together. But even the strongest glue sometimes struggles to hold. When a summer trip doesn't go according to plan, Cat and Chicken end up spending three weeks with grandparents they never knew. For the first time in years, Cat has the opportunity to be a kid again, and the journey she takes shows that even the most broken or strained relationships can be healed if people take the time to walk in one another's shoes.

7.”Muffled” by Jennifer Gennari

Amelia does not like noise. In fifth grade, she has to learn to play an instrument or, as she sees it, make noise on purpose. To help Amelia cope, her father gives her a pair of earmuffs to wear. When she makes a new friend in trombone class, the two form an unlikely friendship that helps Amelia find a way to let in the noisy world she’s muffled for so long.

8.”Tune It Out” by Jamie Sumner

Lou Montgomery has the voice of an angel, or so her mother tells her and anyone else who will listen. But Lou can only hear the fear in her own voice. She’s never liked crowds or loud noises or even high fives; in fact, she’s terrified of them, which makes her pretty sure there’s something wrong with her. When Lou crashes their pickup on a dark and snowy road, child services separate the mother-daughter duo. Now she has to start all over again at a fancy private school far away from anything she’s ever known. With help from an outgoing new friend, her aunt and uncle, and the school counselor, she begins to see things differently. A sensory processing disorder isn’t something to be ashamed of, and music might just be the thing that saves Lou—and maybe her mom, too.

9.”Focused” by Alyson Gerber

Clea can't control her thoughts. She knows she has to do her homework . . . but she gets distracted. She knows she can't just say whatever thought comes into her head . . . but sometimes she can't help herself. She know she needs to focus . . . but how can she do that when the people around her are always chewing gum loudly or making other annoying noises? It's starting to be a problem—not just in school, but when Clea's playing chess or just hanging out with her best friend. Other kids are starting to notice. When Clea fails one too many tests, her parents take her to be tested, and she finds out that she has ADHD, which means her attention is all over the place instead of where it needs to be. Clea knows life can't continue the way it's been going. She's just not sure how you can fix a problem that's all in your head. But that's what she's going to have to do, to find a way to focus.

10.”Fifty-four Things Wrong With Gwendolyn Rogers” by Caela Carter

No one can figure out what Gwendolyn Rogers's problem is--not her mom, or her teachers, or any of the many therapists she's seen. But Gwendolyn knows she doesn't have just one thing wrong with her: she has fifty-four. At least, according to a confidential school report (that she read because she is #16. Sneaky, not to mention #13. Impulsive). So Gwendolyn needs a plan, because if she doesn't get these fifty-four things under control, she's not going to be able to go to horse camp this summer with her half-brother, Tyler. But Tyler can't help her because there's only one thing "wrong" with him: ADHD. And her best friend Hettie can't help her because there's nothing wrong with Hettie. She's perfect. So Gwendolyn is hopeless until she remembers the one thing that helped her mother when her own life was out of control. Or actually, the twelve things. Can these Twelve Steps that cured her mother somehow cure Gwendolyn too?

📚 Happy reading! Remember, everyone is valid! 💖

#themightyreaders #Neurodiversity #AutismSpectrumDisorder #AspergersSyndrome #AuditoryProcessingDisorder #SensoryProcessingDisorder #ADHD #Undiagnosed

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✨Memoir Spotlight✨—“A Little Me” by Amy Roloff

“God doesn’t make mistakes.” For Amy Roloff, star of TLC’s hit reality show Little People, Big World, her father’s words would repeatedly serve as an anchor, reminding her of her inherent worth and purpose, whenever feelings of insecurity and inadequacy surfaced and threatened to overwhelm her. In “A Little Me”, Amy shares what it was like growing up with #Achondroplasia #Dwarfism , how she struggled to overcome obstacles both physical and emotional—navigating the average-size world as a little person, dealing with a serious illness as a young girl, bullying, and issues of body image and unachievable beauty ideals—while learning, as we all must, to accept herself for who she is. Finally allowing herself to be vulnerable enough to open up to others, she learned that it’s worth risking possible rejection for a chance at genuine relationships. Ultimately, it was Amy’s faith, as well as the support and encouragement of her community of loving family and good friends, that saw her through the dark times and allowed her to realize her greatest dreams and beyond. Amy’s memoir is an inspiring and at times heart-wrenching account of resilience and the strength of the human spirit to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles.

📚 Happy reading! ❣️

#themightyreaders #Dwarfism #Achondroplasia #IrritableBowelSyndromeIBS

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× " Sigh... So I'm Just Done Dating... People Are So Immature... " × #Relationships #Depression #Heartbroken

× " I Went Out With A Guy... And He Took Me Bar Hopping And I Guess Somehow I Got Angry With Him... And Slapped Him Out Of Nowhere... What I Remember Is I Tried To Hug Him.. But A Few Minutes Later He Texted Back. Telling To Never Call Him Ever Again And To Delete His Number. And Then He Called Me An Angry Violent Person. Like OK Whatever. I Definitely Know That I'm Not. And Definitely Not A Mean Person. Whatever Person Need To Fix Thier Own Issue's. I Will Apparently Work On Mine..."× Sincerely, ¤¤ S.K. ¤¤ #Depression

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I'm new here!

Hi, my name is SWBubbie3. I'm here because I am currently treating a pregnant woman who is reluctant to commit to any form of therapy for her alcohol consumption. I am looking for resources and some direction regarding preserving the therapeutic relationship while challenging my client to recognize the risks she is taking by continuing to drink alcohol during her pregnancy.

#MightyTogether

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Heroes #Depression #Anxiety #Relationships #FamilyAndFriends #heroes #MentalHealth

As I reflect back on the 63 years I have walked this life I am astounded at the heroes I have encountered. People like the old construction worker who I encountered on my walk to high school. We had a school camp and as he saw me walking with my small suitcase encouraged me to go home and patch things up with my parents. In spite of reassuring him I wasn’t running away and was going to a school camp he told me, “Charlie knows, and if I just talk to them it will be ok”.

Sunday school teachers who put up with my disruptive ways and saw potential beyond a hypo kid.

Doctors and nurses who have looked after me through 16 surgeries, and done so with genuine care and compassion.

My Wife who has visited me countless times when I have been in hospital. Family and friends who stood by me through a horrendous 3 year legal battle without wavering. Fellow patients in psych wards who offered encouragement and hope.

Mr Wells who rode a horse and buggy to deliver fruit and vegetables to us when I was young.

People here on The Mighty who have been amazingly generous with encouragement.

My Wife’s Grandmother who survived the concentration camp at Auschwitz and lived without bitterness or anger.

My congregation who know my mental health journey and support me without judgement or glib opinions.

God, who has never forsaken me or let me down, even though I have let Him down countless times.

Who is your hero?

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