Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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Neurodevelopmental Disorders
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    One thing that scared me the most

    It's important to remember that most people with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders are more likely to be victims than being perpetrators.

    One thing that scared me is I watched murder mysteries, Most Evil and those documentaries explains how delusions motivate those types of serial killers. Most of those serial killers were found NGRI, but some of those killers where found guilty at first, after some time in prison, their delusions became worse and they were also found NGRI as well. I think it's because to be a serial killer, you need to be very intelligent and especially to cover your tracks, and another reason why some of those killers were found guilty at first, it is because they seem to know right from wrong, by the judge asking simple questions, if they understand the charges, some of those delusional killers said that they do, but were later found NGRI after being found sane. Another thing that scared me is slander case, one of them were found guilty, but I heard they they were also civility committed.

    It's like an isolated link between specific types of mental health and criminal behavior. Because, there is such thing as Insanity defence, incompetence, diminished capacity.

    The scary thing is that when I watched documentaries of people becoming serial killers, they start to have a fixed, false belief of whom they are targeting and why. I asked my mom why when people kill three or more innocent people, something about their beliefs is delusional, and she explained to me that they have personality disorders that causes delusional thinking and that no one without those types of personality disorders would want to do that to innocent people.

    Those personality disorders are Antisocial Personality Disorder and Narcissistic Personality Disorder, with symptom of delusions.

    Those serial killers that got NGRI were diagnosed with personality disorders, with delusions as a symptom.

    Question

    ADHD Combined Type

    Do you feel having ADHD Combined Type mostly helps or mostly makes your daily level of neurological functioning worse? I’ve found that in my 30’s it feel almost impossible to hide my symptoms and it’s terrifying and beyond frustrating to function despite some medication changes. I just want to function😔 #ADHD
    #NeurodevelopmentalDisorders

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    Mental health, developmental health and criminal behaviors

    To say that mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders is not the cause for criminal behaviors is too broad.

    Short answer is that most mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders is not the cause for criminal behaviors, but long answer is that mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders is the cause for criminal behaviors, but it depends on what mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders we are talking about.

    The problem is that there are a lot of mental health and neurodevelopental disorders and each mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders are not the same to each other.

    Statistically, most people with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders are more likely to be victims than being perpetrators. There are however small-subgroup of people with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders that commit crimes.

    There are however some mental disorders that is related to criminal behaviors, it includes specific command hallucinations, specific delusions of paranoid and grandiose themes, and Erotomania, specific pathological jealousy , but criminal behaviors is more related to Distributive, Impulsive Control and Conduct Disorders, especially Antisocial Personality Disorder, Narcissistic Personality Disorder and specific Paraphilic Disorders. About Bipolar Disorder, criminal behaviors is more associated with Distributive, Impulsive Control and Conduct Disorders, and specific Paraphilic Disorders. Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder includes impulsively and risky behaviors.

    About Communication Disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder, criminal behaviors in Communication Disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder is mostly related to lack of social skills, not out of maliciousness or sadism.

    Statistically, most people with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders are more likely to be victims than being perpetrators. There are however small-subgroup of people with mental health and neurodevelopmental disorders that commit crimes.

    There are however some mental disorders that is related to criminal behaviors, it includes specific command hallucinations, specific delusions of paranoid and grandiose themes, and Erotomania, specific pathological jealousy , but criminal behaviors is more related to Distributive, Impulsive Control and Conduct Disorders, especially Antisocial Personality Disorder, Narcissistic Personality Disorder and specific Paraphilic Disorders. About Bipolar Disorder, criminal behaviors is more associated with Distributive, Impulsive Control and Conduct Disorders, and specific Paraphilic Disorders. Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder includes impulsively and risky behaviors.

    About Communication Disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder, criminal behaviors in Communication Disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder is mostly related to lack of social skills, not out of maliciousness or sadism.

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    Which neurodivergent traits are you most thankful for?

    I am thankful for the organizational skills I have developed as a result of my neurodivergence, as well as the connection I share with animals.
    #thankful #nd #NeurodevelopmentalDisorders

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    Autism

    For people on the autism spectrum that went to college, ehat was your experience like? What did professors do that was helpful and/or unhelpful?#NeurodevelopmentalDisorders

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    I lack emotional intelligence...

    I think, that's what I do. I think rather than feel. I didn't appreciate to what extent I do that but now I am becoming aware. It's part autism, part trauma, part autistic trauma. A coping strategy for a life in a world I don't quite understand yet. A world that hurts me more often than I feel it should.
    I was sad at first to see those words written in my diagnosis, to learn that I needed support to heal my psychosocial dysfunction. But on reflection it's not all bad. I've survived, thrived even, this far. My childlike enthusiasm and naivety allows me to still see and trust all that's good in the world. My openness has allowed me to build a few good positive social connections. My creativity has given me freedom to play and learn and my imagination offers me a safe escape route.
    I'm vulnerable, raw and tired but I'm strong and in recognising that about myself I've already started to heal. #PTSD #Autism #Disability #NeurodevelopmentalDisorders #Trauma

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    Step One: Get an ADHD diagnosis... #AdultADHD #ADHD

    Tomorrow, March 24th 2021 at 11 a.m., I begin my assessment with a psychiatrist to determine whether or not I have attention deficit disorder (ADHD is what it's called these days).

    I was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder at 6 years old in the 90s, but my mother never followed up with this (and many other things I was diagnosed with). I spent years knowing that something was wrong but not being able to understand or articulate well what it was that was wrong with me.

    Now I'm 31 years old. I found some old papers, given to me by accident actually, and all of this information fell in my lap that now I couldn't ignore. I decided to take the leap: go for medication. I knew that I've been struggling to function. I knew that I felt like I was heading towards "burn out" and I knew that this wasn't my first time coming to this.

    I have been educating myself about ADHD since I knew this day was coming and trying to piece together whether I thought I truly have this condition or something else...and I truly believe that I am going down the right path.

    So now.... I have the opportunity to actually deal with this. I know that this is the first step of many.... to be fair, I don't know if ADHD medication will help me, but I can imagine that it wouldn't hurt to try - especially after all this time. Just start somewhere here....

    I just hope to be validated and heard. I have been given a heads up to kind of know what to expect from a psychiatrist. From what I read about her, I just hope that she will be able to at least show me compassion by hearing me out.

    I have been invalidated for most of my life. I have been told over and over to "get myself together" to find that I literally didn't have the strength or the "know-how" to do it on my own. Now, with the notes from a pediatric neurologist.... I know that I wasn't off to recognise that my challenges are real and they were diagnosed even though I didn't know it was typed out on paper.

    Here's to taking my first step. #medications #ADHD #Adderall #AttentiondeficithyperactivityDisorder #Neurodiversity #NeurodevelopmentalDisorders #neuromotordisorder #neurodiverse #AttentiondeficitDisorder