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    Gratitude and Appreciation cycle

    #Anxiety #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    To open our discussion, it’s helpful to note that gratitude and appreciation energize many separate stages of program development and community building. The following diagram illustrates them. It takes the form of a cycle, moving clockwise; however, the cycle’s order is adaptable and can be varied according to a particular situation. From our perspective, starting the process on the top of the diagram, with an authentic welcome of all participants – including residents, volunteers, employees, and funders – is a good place to begin.

    By using the cycle in the diagram as a framework, and moving clockwise around it from the top, here is what these program stages might look like in actual community practice:

    -When people come to your program, welcome them! Whether there are two people or twenty, welcome them. Listen to them; listen to their ideas and experience; learn from them. Acknowledge the value of their experience. Allow yourself to be influenced by the people you are serving in community. When people feel welcome, they are more likely to return; and they may bring their friends. (We elaborate on the power of welcoming later on in this section.)

    -As people start to engage in your program’s activities, recognize and appreciate their efforts and skills. Acknowledge the abilities and perspectives they bring to your program. This also means being open to learning how your participants might engage in activities differently than you. Include a variety of approaches and experiences. Try something new. Be gracious in observing differences.

    -Appreciate and be guided by the cultural dynamics of the community you serve. This means being sensitive to the seasons, foods, events, and resources available in your community at various times of the year. Learn from the people around you. Adapt your own approach to reflect the interests, resources, and aptitudes of your program participants, volunteers, funders, and other stakeholders.

    -Engage in both planned and spontaneous acts of recognition and appreciation for what you have achieved together after several weeks or months of meetings. In addition, you can incorporate both formal and informal acts of gratitude and appreciation for each other, for your program, or for something that you share. Such actions can occur regularly, and become part of your program’s normal operation.

    -As participants start to become more comfortable with each other, and problem areas come up, innovate. Do something different. Keep getting participant feedback, and then create something to delight or surprise someone, somewhere. Take a small risk in addressing a priority of the group. Evaluate the results. Modify as needed. Do it again.

    -Invite both planned and spontaneous feedback. After your program has been operating for a while, evaluate and assess how things have been going, where you have gotten to, and where you are going next. Use Appreciative Inquiry and ask, for example, “What did you enjoy about this activity?”, or “What surprised you when we tried this…?” (See more details on Appreciative Inquiry in a supplement to this section under Tools.) Ask other important questions about your project. If you wish to influence your group, allow them to influence you.

    -Give thanks for the opportunities your program has enjoyed – such as the opportunities of getting to know each other and learning together; the opportunities of embarking on new adventures and having new experiences together; the opportunities to be safe and comfortable together.

    -Celebrate, with awards or other kinds of recognition for the expertise and successes you have gained individually and collectively. Your celebrations can be as formal as giving out engraved certificates, or as informal as a pizza party or meeting in a new spot. People almost always like to be recognized, whether in large ways or small. Invite a sister or brother program to come and join you. Share some highlights or challenges as you build partnerships. Go on a group outing to discover a new community resource or place of interest. Share your discoveries together.

    With this overview as a background, let’s continue to identify some other specific ways you as a community builder can use and apply gratitude and appreciation in your own community work. Some of these strategies focus on times when you are already familiar with the community setting and well integrated within it. At other times, though, you may be a relative newcomer, or just starting out. We’ll consider both types of situations.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Gratitude and Well being

    #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    Gratitude, thankfulness, or gratefulness is from the Latin word gratus, which means "pleasing" or "thankful." Is regarded as a feeling of appreciation (or similar positive response) by a recipient of another's kindness. This can be gifts, help, favors, or another form of generosity to another person. The absence of gratitude where gratitude is expected is called ingratitude or ungratefulness. Historically, gratitude has been a part of several world religions. It also has been a topic of interest to ancient, medieval, and modern philosophers.

    The systematic study of gratitude within the field of psychology began in 1998 when Martin Seligman introduced a new branch of psychology that he termed positive psychology. This new branch adds a new focus on the reinforcement of positive traits.

    The study of gratitude in psychology has included an attempt to understand the short term experience of the gratitude response (state gratitude), individual differences in how frequently gratitude is felt among individuals (trait gratitude), and the relationship between these two. The therapeutic benefits of gratitude have also been taken into consideration.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Gratitude

    #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    Gratitude, thankfulness, or gratefulness is from the Latin word gratus, which means "pleasing" or "thankful." Is regarded as a feeling of appreciation (or similar positive response) by a recipient of another's kindness. This can be gifts, help, favors, or another form of generosity[5] to another person. The absence of gratitude where gratitude is expected is called ingratitude or ungratefulness.

    Historically, gratitude has been a part of several world religions. It also has been a topic of interest to ancient, medieval, and modern philosophers.

    The systematic study of gratitude within the field of psychology began in 1998 when Martin Seligman introduced a new branch of psychology that he termed positive psychology. This new branch adds a new focus on the reinforcement of positive traits.

    The study of gratitude in psychology has included an attempt to understand the short term experience of the gratitude response (state gratitude), individual differences in how frequently gratitude is felt among individuals (trait gratitude), and the relationship between these two. The therapeutic benefits of gratitude have also been taken into consideration.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Guided meditation and Gratitude

    #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    Tara Brach, the founder and mentor of the Insight Meditation Community Of Washington (n.d.), described that, beginning and successfully participating in guided gratitude meditation has four basic requirements:

    Daily practice – Consistency is vital for any meditation. To explore and enjoy the full benefits of guided meditation practice, it is vital that we commit to daily practice.

    Location and time – The brain works in strange ways. If we choose a particular time and place for practicing guided meditation every day, chances are better that we will benefit from it more. Most practitioners recommend using a comfortable spot for meditation practice that is free from excess light, sound, or physical distractions.

    The right posture – The ideal guided meditation posture is a comfortable sitting position with the neck extended and the back straight. The proper stance allows smooth blood circulation and breathing. A tired body may tend to slouch the back or fold the legs, but it is vital that we correct the posture every time it goes wrong.

    Zero judgment – The first time may be a complete failure. But we must not let it overrule our commitment to daily practice. The mind may wander, get distracted, or get disappointed by the underachievements, but our goal is to prevent this frustration and look beyond the temporary obstacles.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Gratitude

    #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    Gratitude, thankfulness, or gratefulness is from the Latin word gratus, which means "pleasing" or "thankful." Is regarded as a feeling of appreciation (or similar positive response) by a recipient of another's kindness. This can be gifts, help, favors, or another form of generosity to another person. The absence of gratitude where gratitude is expected is called ingratitude or ungratefulness. Historically, gratitude has been a part of several world religions. It also has been a topic of interest to ancient, medieval, and modern philosophers.

    The systematic study of gratitude within the field of psychology began in 1998 when Martin Seligman introduced a new branch of psychology that he termed positive psychology. This new branch adds a new focus on the reinforcement of positive traits. The study of gratitude in psychology has included an attempt to understand the short term experience of the gratitude response (state gratitude), individual differences in how frequently gratitude is felt among individuals (trait gratitude), and the relationship between these two. The therapeutic benefits of gratitude have also been taken into consideration.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Wheel of gratitude

    #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    Gratitude is the expression of appreciation for what one has. It is a recognition of value independent of monetary worth. Spontaneously generated from within, it is an affirmation of goodness and warmth. This social emotion strengthens relationships, and its roots run deep in evolutionary history—emanating from the survival value of helping others and being helped in return. Studies show that specific areas of the brain are involved in experiencing and expressing gratitude. Brain scans of people assigned a task that stimulates expression of gratitude show lasting changes in the prefrontal cortex that heighten sensitivity to future experiences of gratitude.

    Gratitude is a spontaneous feeling but, increasingly, research demonstrates its value as a practice—that is, making conscious efforts to count one’s blessings. Studies show that people can deliberately cultivate gratitude—and there are important social and personal benefits to doing so. It is possible to feel grateful for loved ones, colleagues, animals, nature, and life in general. The emotion generates a climate of positivity that both reaches inward and extends outward.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Benefits of gratitude

    #Anxiety #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    There are many benefits of gratitude, both mental and physical. Regular practice has been shown to have measurable positive effects on health.

    Gratitude improves physical health. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health.

    Improves mental health

    Gratitude is one of many factors that contributes to positive mental health outcomes.

    One 2020 study showed that regularly practicing gratitude can help ease symptoms of anxiety and depression. An older study from 2003 noted that gratitude was linked to improved mood.

    Practicing gratitude fosters positive feelings and can contribute to a sense of well-being when done regularly.

    Improved relationships

    Gratitude not only improves your physical and mental well-being; it may also improve your relationships.

    Gratitude plays a key role in forming relationships, as well as in strengthening existing ones.

    When it comes to romantic relationships, gratitude can help partners feel more satisfied with each other. One 2010 study showed that partners who demonstrated gratitude toward one another reported increased relationship satisfaction and improved happiness the following day.

    Grateful people sleep better. Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Gratitude and Appreciation cycle

    #Workplace #Gratitude #Wellbeing

    By using the cycle in the diagram as a framework, and moving clockwise around it from the top, here is what these program stages might look like in actual community practice:

    -When people come to your program, welcome them! Whether there are two people or twenty, welcome them. Listen to them; listen to their ideas and experience; learn from them. Acknowledge the value of their experience. Allow yourself to be influenced by the people you are serving in community. When people feel welcome, they are more likely to return; and they may bring their friends. (We elaborate on the power of welcoming later on in this section.)

    -As people start to engage in your program’s activities, recognize and appreciate their efforts and skills. Acknowledge the abilities and perspectives they bring to your program. This also means being open to learning how your participants might engage in activities differently than you. Include a variety of approaches and experiences. Try something new. Be gracious in observing differences.

    -Appreciate and be guided by the cultural dynamics of the community you serve. This means being sensitive to the seasons, foods, events, and resources available in your community at various times of the year. Learn from the people around you. Adapt your own approach to reflect the interests, resources, and aptitudes of your program participants, volunteers, funders, and other stakeholders.

    -Engage in both planned and spontaneous acts of recognition and appreciation for what you have achieved together after several weeks or months of meetings. In addition, you can incorporate both formal and informal acts of gratitude and appreciation for each other, for your program, or for something that you share. Such actions can occur regularly, and become part of your program’s normal operation.

    -As participants start to become more comfortable with each other, and problem areas come up, innovate. Do something different. Keep getting participant feedback, and then create something to delight or surprise someone, somewhere. Take a small risk in addressing a priority of the group. Evaluate the results. Modify as needed. Do it again.

    -Invite both planned and spontaneous feedback. After your program has been operating for a while, evaluate and assess how things have been going, where you have gotten to, and where you are going next. Use Appreciative Inquiry and ask, for example, “What did you enjoy about this activity?”, or “What surprised you when we tried this…?” (See more details on Appreciative Inquiry in a supplement to this section under Tools.) Ask other important questions about your project. If you wish to influence your group, allow them to influence you.

    -Give thanks for the opportunities your program has enjoyed – such as the opportunities of getting to know each other and learning together; the opportunities of embarking on new adventures and having new experiences together; the opportunities to be safe and comfortable together.

    -Celebrate, with awards or other kinds of recognition for the expertise and successes you have gained individually and collectively. Your celebrations can be as formal as giving out engraved certificates, or as informal as a pizza party or meeting in a new spot. People almost always like to be recognized, whether in large ways or small. Invite a sister or brother program to come and join you. Share some highlights or challenges as you build partnerships. Go on a group outing to discover a new community resource or place of interest. Share your discoveries together.

    You can refer to this:

    resiliens.com/resilify/program/the-science-of-gratitude-and-wellbeing

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    Reaping the Mental Health Benefits of Learning a New Skill #Depression #OtherMentalHealth #happy #Selfcare #EmotionalHealth

    Yesterday my family and I experienced archery for the very first time. I had vowed to get out more for my mental health. And also so that my homeschool children could get out more. They have started to become homebodies like their mama. I am so excited to share here with The Mighty how I felt so much joy after our time shooting arrows.

    I’m a lefty and so I was incredibly nervous that I would have difficulties aiming and hitting the targets. But to my surprise I actually hit a bullseye on my very first try (see picture above). I am so proud of myself. My archery instructor mouth dropped when I hit the handrawn skeleton robot. And she was like, “She hit a bullseye on her first shot.” Everyone in the archery range gasped and were looking at me.

    My introverted self was like, OMG. I am not used to the attention or even being good at anything that requires athletic skills.

    As I continued to shoot at the other targets. I hit another bullseye that was further out. And the instructor said, “Mama’s a champion!”
    I am just not used to being applauded or complimented. Especially in a public setting where everyone will stare in your direction.
    I am grateful though for the kindness I’d received.

    But, I do want to end this with an encouragement to whomever is reading this to learn a new skill. According to research it increases happiness, fuels self confidence, gives you a sense of purpose and so much more. I needed this more than anything. And I hope that you get to feel the good feelings that I felt.
    I absolutely can’t wait for my family’s next archery adventure.🖤🏹
    #Wellbeing #MentalHealth #TheMighty

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