Sleep Apnea

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    Community Voices

    Grandkids fun time! #Anxiety #Depression

    <p>Grandkids fun time! <a class="tm-topic-link mighty-topic" title="Anxiety" href="/topic/anxiety/" data-id="5b23ce5f00553f33fe98d1b4" data-name="Anxiety" aria-label="hashtag Anxiety">#Anxiety</a>  <a class="tm-topic-link mighty-topic" title="Depression" href="/topic/depression/" data-id="5b23ce7600553f33fe991123" data-name="Depression" aria-label="hashtag Depression">#Depression</a> </p>
    30 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    Name three thoughts or affirmations you can practice before bed to challenge intrusive thoughts or overthinking.

    <p>Name three thoughts or affirmations you can practice before bed to challenge intrusive thoughts or overthinking.<br></p>
    21 people are talking about this
    Janet Coburn

    Can Sleep Apnea Affect Your Mental Health?

    My husband and I both have sleep apnea. We also both have depression, or at least he does, and I have bipolar disorder with a pretty hefty depressive bent. Sleep apnea is a medical condition in which a person stops breathing multiple times a night. The body responds to this by resuming breathing after a second or two, but sleep disruption has already occurred. For my husband, this occurs up to 60 times a night, while it happens to me more like six times. Technically, my version is called “hypopnea” (hypo+pnea – low+breath; apnea, a+pnea – no+breath.) The body depends on breathing, of course, for oxygen, but it also depends on sleep – which is disrupted in sleep apnea – for proper functioning. REM sleep, for example, is vital for dreaming, which has multiple beneficial effects on the body and mind. REM sleep has been known to be altered in depression, and studies have suggested that it is involved in modulating mood symptoms, including psychological distress in general. One of the more observable symptoms of sleep apnea is loud and prolonged snoring, which both my husband and I have experienced. While I was traveling with my mother, she even requested that I let her go to sleep first since my snoring kept her awake. But what does sleep apnea actually do to the brain? Surely lack of oxygen to the brain has some effect. Indeed it does. According to research conducted at UCLA, “gasping during the night that characterizes obstructive sleep apnea can damage the brain in ways that lead to high blood pressure, depression, memory loss, and anxiety.” Sleep apnea has been associated with difficulty concentrating, memory problems, poor decision-making, depression, and stress. A study published in Sleep Health found that untreated sleep apnea increases the chance of anxiety by over three and a half times; depression, by more than three times; severe psychological distress, by not quite three times; and suicidal thoughts, by more than two and a half times. Sleep apnea has also been associated with PTSD. The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine recommends that “in individuals with [obstructive sleep apnea] and psychiatric illness, treatment of both disorders should be considered for optimal treatment outcomes.” Studies suggest that sleep apnea is linked with changes in at least two neurotransmitters in the brain (GABA and glutamate) that combine and coordinate signals that help regulate emotions, thinking, and some physical functions. Researchers plan to investigate whether treatments for sleep apnea will help these brain chemical levels return to normal. SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) such as fluoxetine and sertraline (Prozac and Zoloft) are thought to be valuable in treating sleep apnea. One study indicated that SSRIs may be a good treatment option for [sleep apnea], particularly for those [patients] with epilepsy. Another study showed a link between “having sleep apnea and increased odds of having a mental health issue” or symptoms such as anxiety or thoughts of suicide. Treatments for sleep apnea include dental appliances to be worn while sleeping, lifestyle changes, and even surgeries. These treatments sometimes address snoring directly, but not the underlying mechanism. The more effective treatment is “positive air pressure,” delivered by CPAP machines. CPAPs use positive air pressure to keep the sleeper’s airway from collapsing, which is what impedes their breathing and jolts their brains into resuming it. They consist of a unit that generates air pressure, a hose and mask to deliver it, and assorted straps to keep the hose in place throughout the night. The masks can be ones that cover the entire nose and mouth or cannulas that are simply placed in the nostrils. There are also cushions on the masks or available separately that reduce discomfort as well as waking up with “mask face.” Many people find the masks uncomfortable to wear all night, but others use them not only at night but also for naps. Unlike a ventilator, the CPAP doesn’t breathe for a person. It allows them to breathe more effectively on their own. Diagnosing sleep apnea requires a “sleep study” ordered by a doctor. Assorted leads are attached to the subject, who then spends all night sleeping (or trying to). Breathing rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and other parameters are measured and a record is kept of the number of times the subject stops breathing during the night. This is sent to the doctor, who can then prescribe a CPAP unit and mask. Dan and I both use CPAP machines. They are a bit inconvenient, especially when we travel and have to take power cords so we both can use them at the same time (and power converters when we travel abroad). When it comes to packing, the machines are a bit bulky and somewhat heavy. Still, we take them with us religiously. Has sleep apnea treatment improved our mental health? It’s hard to tell, especially since we’re both taking SSRIs anyway. I know correlation isn’t causation, but our depression and bipolar have certainly eased up since we started getting treatment and our sleep cycles have become more regular. But if all it does is stop the snoring, that’s still a win for us. So, if you snore a lot and have a mental health condition, you might want to be tested for sleep apnea and treated if you do. Like chicken soup, it can’t hurt and might help.

    Community Voices

    Recently diagnosed grade 2 Diostolic Dysfunction and scared

    I went to ER recently and after a ton of testing I was told my heart was slightly to mildly enlarged and that the echo showed that my heart struggles to relax. The Emergency department didn’t make it seem like a big deal, in fact they didn’t even tell me the name of the heart issue. I looked at my medical records and saw stage 2 diostolic dysfunction and haven’t stopped panicking since. My X-ray looked good except the slight heart enlargement, it said no sign of heart failure, the troponin was elevated then lowered then elevated again and stayed steady on the 4th one. They didn’t do any cath test or stress test. They only did ekg which was normal, holier monitor for 12hrs which was normal, CT and chest X-ray. I am 34 and over 400lbs. I have been working on weight loss a lot lately and I never knew there was a issue with my heart. I had palpatations off and on for years and had a full cardio work up in 2017 and in 2020 and everything was normal. I have sleep apnea but I use CPAP, I have hypothyroidism but I use Levothyroxine. I know my colesterol was high in the past but it hadn’t been tested since 2020. I have occasional bouts of hypertension but it’s usually at the doctor and normally it’s between 116/80 to 130/80. The BP was really high at the hospital. I’m also pre diabetic and have PCOS. I’m not a big fan of taking meds and would love to be able to treat this holistic. I’m really scared I’ve been given a death sentence. I’ve been eating heart healthy since I left the hospital 4 days ago but I did a drastic dip in calories out of anxiety. #dostolic Dysfunction stage 2

    4 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    If you could create an ideal sleep routine and environment, what would it look it?

    <p>If you could create an ideal sleep routine and environment, what would it look it?</p>
    19 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    Self care cart

    <p>Self care cart</p>
    10 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    Equal Consideration. Is there such a thing where a chronic, invisible illness exists?

    <p>Equal Consideration. Is there such a thing where a chronic, invisible illness exists?</p>
    4 people are talking about this
    Community Voices
    Community Voices

    Frustrating news

    I’ve had a really hard time these last couple of years with #Hypersomnia / #Narcolepsy symptoms, so I finally went to a sleep doctor. My insurance won’t cover an in-clinic sleep study, so I had to settle for the home study, which was NOT accurate in terms of sleep efficiency and sleep latency readings, but said that I *barely* have mild sleep apnea, and only on my back. Apparently, “true” hypersomnia and narcolepsy are extremely complicated to diagnose, even with an in-depth sleep study.

    So, my doctor and I explored all the options:

    -sleep aid at night: already tried it, and doesn’t solve my excessive daytime sleepiness

    -wakefulness aid: (ie: stimulants) can’t prescribe due to my tachycardia

    -sleep position therapy: keeps me from sleeping on my back, which is the position recommended by my previous physio for my back/hip pain

    - mouth guard: probably won’t work, due to my lack of teeth, and is currently out of my budget

    - CPAP: complete pain in the butt and expensive, and a bit overkill for the “borderlinesleep apnea diagnosis

    - Scheduling: what I’ve been trying to do anyways, but doesn’t work, because I get so dang tired at random times and my kids and I have things to do.

    I’m feeling so stuck and frustrated, because I just want my frigging life back! I want to have the energy to do all the things I’m supposed to do, and I was really hoping this might hold some answers.

    #SupraventricularTachycardia
    #Fibromyalgia
    #Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis

    2 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    What is your biggest challenge when it comes to falling asleep at night?

    <p>What is your biggest challenge when it comes to falling asleep at night?</p>
    32 people are talking about this