Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

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Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome
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    Community Voices

    Anyone heard of this woman??

    Hi everyone! My name is Amy and I was recently diagnosed with #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder . Just like when I was FINALLY diagnosed with #CyclicVomitingSyndrome it’s weirdly refreshing and freeing just to have a name to put on the thing that has controlled my life and destroyed my relationships. I found this site by accident. I am in healthcare, so I am an research (peer reviewed, empirical, stories, videos…whatever will help me understand) so I typically end up spending hours going down multiple rabbit holes.
    I doing this, I ran across videos from a lady named AJ Mahari. WOW! If I didn’t hate who I was and what I did to those I love before, I surely did after watching some of her stuff!! I realize her videos are more directed towards the partners of those with BPD, but she is brutal and so off course on several things. The two videos that stopped me in my tracks (because all of the research and articles I read say the exact opposite, and I know what I feel) discuss that 1) “Borderlines Don't Cant & Won’t Love You or Attach To You”, and 2) “ Loving a Borderline Is Impossible”. Well if my inner demons weren’t screaming already, they certainly were after seeing and hearing her video. Has anyone else “experienced” her? #BorderlinePersonalityDisorder #CyclicVomitingSyndrome #Depression #Anxiety

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    Community Voices

    Experienced yet confused

    I have suffered from depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember. I also have seizures and Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome, PTSD, been told I was bipolar by a shrink I have sought help and now take medications to help. Even though I myself for the most part can handle myself I have recently found out my 16yr old son is so depressed he is suicidal. I knew he was depressed I guess I didn’t realize how depressed he really was. I got him to see a counselor but they only meet for 30 min every 2-3 weeks. I don’t feel like it’s enough am I wrong? He doesn’t want to take meds. Should I make him? Should I have my Pastor counsel as well? Can anyone please give me any advice? It would be much appreciated. Any ideas or advice anything would help. I’m so worried and it’s making my anxiety and depression worse but I would never tell him that. Does anyone have any ideas that could also help me? I’ve seen about drawing or coloring, reading, and writing. Does anyone find that these things help for themselves or for teens? Again any advice or ideas would be so great. Thanks in advance.

    4 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    I find myself back in the hospital following yet another #Suicide attempt. I’ve done it so many times that I lost count. The police are counting though… this time makes five (5). I am lying here in a psychiatric hospital feeling hopeless and like recovery is not possible.

    3 people are talking about this
    Community Voices
    Jessica Ceisel

    These Medical Professionals Helped My Child Get Over Her Needle Phobia

    That night began as she was buried face first into my chest shaking and arms covered in bruises from being pinned down the previous day. The anticipation of another poke was more than her little body or mind could bear. This was the second time in two days her IV needed to be replaced, the idea of it alone was immobilizing for our 9-year-old daughter who had developed a super-sized phobia of needles. As I held her tightly, trying to bring her little body and mind any little bit of comfort I could, I was suppressing my own fears and emotions. I was not sure how I was going to get through the next poke myself. Through the years I had become hardened as I watched my little warrior go through procedures, hospitalizations and surgeries. Things that would have previously shattered me, became routine. My strength grew with each test, each visit, each night spent on the bathroom floor. But in this moment I didn’t know how I was going to get through the next poke either. I could not watch the familiar scene of a team of nurses holding my sweet girl down as she struggled screaming at the top of her fragile lungs for them to stop. The pain and trauma were too great to bear. I wouldn’t do it again; we were both breaking. What I didn’t know was there were three heroes in blue who were about to walk through our hospital room door and change the trajectory of our journey forever. When they are not out saving the world the children’s hospital transport team assists in various situations throughout the hospital. That night, they were called to help us. As soon as they suited up to enter our isolation room, they immediately felt the tension in the air. Rather than getting to work on her IV right away, they sat with her. Over the next two and half hours they built a rapport sharing jokes, chatting about candy in their pockets, watching helicopters take off/land, but most importantly they listened to her, validating her feelings. Slowly our girl’s nerves began to ease. It was the first time she felt seen. They heard her little voice. Never before had anyone respected her feelings and emotions like the transport team did that night. Eventually, we got settled in and they began to place the IV. Like so many times before the first poke didn’t work. After allowing her some space to recover and prepare for the next poke, they got to work again. I must have been more outwardly nervous than I realized because as I was watching them prepare the needle I noticed someone was rubbing my back, reassuring me we would get to the other side of this. A few seconds later, our girl was dripping blood everywhere but the team didn’t want to lose the vein. It wasn’t even a thought, it was a reaction, they put themselves at risk and when their gloves became too saturated with blood to stay steady they were ripped off and went soaring through the air. They were determined not to poke our girl again. Once the IV was finally placed one of our heroes in blue instinctively kissed my daughter on the top of her head. In that moment she wasn’t a healthcare professional, she was a simply human loving a tiny human. They left that night not knowing the impact they left on our hearts. It wasn’t that they were able to get the IV in without restraining our girl, it was that they made our girl feel like her voice and emotions mattered. In the months that followed we often talked about our heroes in blue and because of that night our daughter was slowly able to find her own power and begin to work through her needle phobia. Last week we found ourselves back in the exact same inpatient room. When our girl’s IV needed to be replaced we didn’t give it a second thought and immediately requested the help of our friends on transport team. A few minutes later we saw the flash of the blue jumpsuits through the door, one of the heroes was our friend from just three months before. This time there was no crying or screaming, this time she sat by herself and the IV was placed within minutes. Just as they were taping the IV down to her arm another hero from the fall walked in carrying a bag. She had made our sweet girl a present but we had been discharged before she could get it to us. For three months the gift sat in her locker and she looked to see if our girl had returned. What happened that night in October in room 1102 was the single most beautiful thing I have ever been a part of. Nobody cured our daughter’s illnesses, but they saved her heart that day. And our journey will never be the same again. At the age of 9 our daughter felt something that some people never get the opportunity to feel: true human connection with no strings attached. Transport team often saves lives, I just don’t think they expected to save ours this way.

    Community Voices
    Community Voices

    Advice for trying not to eat when you throw everything up? #Gastroparesis #ChronicIllness #CyclicVomitingSyndrome #ChronicPain

    I’m not able to eat at all without throwing up and in turn being in excruciating pain after. I get cravings and get hungry like everyone else, so I just give in and eat knowing i will regret it. Does anyone have advice or tips for ignoring wanting to eat/ignoring the cravings or trying your best not to eat?
    #Gastroparesis #ChronicIllness

    3 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    How can I get rid of heavy periods and pms?

    Every time it's the same. My periods and my pms are always heavy and cause many side effects like, pain, cramps, nausea, dizziness, exhaustion, and sometimes passing out. Another problem is that I often have it twice a month and that hormonal medication doesn't work well and causes uncomfortable side effects. How can I get rid of it? #Dysmenorrhea #Period #Periods #NauseaAndVomiting #CyclicVomitingSyndrome #PMS #exhaustion #Passingout

    3 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    Easy Food Recommendations?

    I’m on TPN because I have an undiagnosed Stomach Disorder that my Doctors are still trying to figure out.
    The thing is that I try not to eat as I get severe pain from it and I throw up every single thing I even try to eat because I can’t hold it down.
    Does anyone have any recommendations for foods that are easy to come back up?
    #TPN #ChronicIllness #Food #Gastroparesis #ChronicPain #Advice #Recommendations #CyclicVomitingSyndrome #Other

    11 people are talking about this
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