bipolar stigma

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    Help for sleeplessness

    I'm new here!
    Hi, my name is Sarahvish_25. I'm here because my wife is a treated With bipolar last 7 years, she recently had a relapse after one medication was dropped by gp. She is now taking updated medications ..lithium and quetapine . She's not sleeping during night times and keeps watching mobile phone . This gets her sleep deprived and gets stereotypical imaginations. I have tried to convince her not to use mobile phones while sleeping., but it didn't work out.i have asked Samaritan groups and also requested for CBT., but no response yet . How do I handle this situation. The more she keeps herself awake during nights .., the more the issues. She's not in listening state as she thinks am trying to spoil her happiness. Has anyone gone through this situation.?. Please advise .. #BipolarDisorder #BipolarDisorder #BipolarObsessiveness #Mania #BipolarStigma #Bipolar1Disorder

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    Community Voices
    Community Voices

    Paranoid and very annoyed

    My trauma is all consuming and confusing I can’t think without overdoing and analyzing every word till Im losing the point of the root of the message and I forget the next steps in the routine trip on my feet stumble stutter and hope you don’t interrupt while I think
    Im not done yet I’m not done yet
    My point is that
    I still haven’t made my point
    I can’t think with all the static in my ears
    And all the stuff in the viewfinder cant fucking focus or zoom in stuck on automatic with no swing in my step or skip in my spring
    Bouncing bouncing
    What do I even hold to be true to me?
    I still haven’t made a point
    Pointless, all of it,
    So it would seem
    Intelligent but still not like it seems
    Intel
    Intel
    Intell me I’m in hell and it feels like you can tell and see
    The sweat forming bead dripping down on my brow
    All these thoughts just shot the fuck out
    12 gauge, buckshot
    Calibre to kill some time
    Just don’t
    Interrupt me
    When I’m
    Fucking
    Looking
    For the point
    Looking for the point
    Sputtering
    Stuttering
    Mostly mostly
    Suffering
    Fucking
    Looking
    For the point
    I’m still talking
    Traffics really unpredictable
    I still haven’t found out if I consider it all livable
    #BipolarDisorder #Mania #Ramble #MightyPoets #BipolarStigma #FlightOfIdeas

    2 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    I was diagnosed bipolar in 2001 and have never written that sentence before. The stigma of being bipolar has always been a huge wall in front of me. Recently I told my managers and one co-worker that I was bipolar. I missed a week of work because of a depressive episode and my psychiatrist gave me a doctors note. The note had his letterhead so they knew I had some kind of mental health issue. I told them I was bipolar and now I am obsessing over thoughts like: “what if they are judging me?” And “what if I don’t get the promotion because they know I am bipolar?” These thoughts are immersive and even seep into my dreams - making me feel unworthy. Not Mighty. One moment I feel free because I told them, the next my paranoia takes over and I think they are all plotting behind my back. I am stable, medicated, a “good girl who takes her meds” according to my psychiatrist but I feel inferior because they know. I am crazy. I am not getting that promotion. I shouldn’t have told them. But wait, maybe they are woke? Maybe they see me for who I am? Maybe I’m stable and wonderful - the queen of her bipolar domain. #BipolarObsessiveness #Stigma #Bipolar #Bipolar2Disorder

    8 people are talking about this
    Community Voices

    I was diagnosed bipolar in 2001 and have never written that sentence before. The stigma of being bipolar has always been a huge wall in front of me. Recently I told my managers and one co-worker that I was bipolar. I missed a week of work because of a depressive episode and my psychiatrist gave me a doctors note. The note had his letterhead so they knew I had some kind of mental health issue. I told them I was bipolar and now I am obsessing over thoughts like: “what if they are judging me?” And “what if I don’t get the promotion because they know I am bipolar?” These thoughts are immersive and even seep into my dreams - making me feel unworthy. Not Mighty. One moment I feel free because I told them, the next my paranoia takes over and I think they are all plotting behind my back. I am stable, medicated, a “good girl who takes her meds” according to my psychiatrist but I feel inferior because they know. I am crazy. I am not getting that promotion. I shouldn’t have told them. But wait, maybe they are woke? Maybe they see me for who I am? Maybe I’m stable and wonderful - the queen of her bipolar domain. #BipolarObsessiveness #Stigma #Bipolar #Bipolar2Disorder

    1 person is talking about this
    Sarah Ross
    Sarah Ross @snr4
    contributor

    Real Negative Workplace Mental Health Experiences

    I’ve worked in a fair few different companies in my life and only two have stood out with good knowledge and understanding on mental health . As much as most workplaces would like to think they are doing a great job of raising awareness on mental health by slapping a few posters around the office with bits of information and helplines, or doing a fundraiser one day of the year, it’s actually not enough. Recently — in the last year or so — I’ve had two different experiences that stood out the most to me, both in different workplaces. The first one, I was in a meeting with a manager about how I could declutter some of the wall space around the office. There was a pamphlet on the desk about a mental health awareness event they had and it had some resources on there where employees could reach out if they were struggling. I said, “I think it’d be a good idea if we kept these pinned on the walls as I didn’t know this was available myself,” to which the manager replied: “No, they aren’t necessary, and you wouldn’t know about it because it’s not available to employees like you.” (I was on a contract from another company within this one.) I was taken aback. I wondered if she even realized how offensive and rude what she said was, or maybe in her head one day is enough for people to know the resources they have available for people struggling with their mental health . Well, the people who were eligible. The second incident, I had just gotten out of hospital after spending a night there getting tests done, as I just had a horrific panic attack that had very similar symptoms to a heart attack and seizure. I was extremely drained and knew there was no way I’d be able to go to work later that day and function well. So, I called in and said I won’t be able to come in as I was feeling unwell. My manager cut me off mid-sentence, demanding details of why I was unwell. Once I told her I’d been in hospital, she sighed and hung up the phone on me. This same manager has her name printed on the wall in our break room as someone you can talk to if you are struggling with your mental health . And, I’m not even exaggerating here; the poster says, “There will be no judgment, it will be in complete confidence.” It’s gotta be a joke, right? I think that, sometimes, workplaces like to make out they are all for mental health , but only when it’s on their terms. I don’t think they realize the depth of mental health issues and how much they can affect a person — physically, too. People are generally looked down upon when they call in sick as if they’re not allowed to take time to heal themselves. This puts pressure on people and increases anxiety around being open when they really are unwell and struggling. This then forces people to act like everything is OK until the inevitable breakdown happens. It’s a vicious cycle and I’ve been caught in it far too many times. I used to lie on job applications about my bipolar disorder because I thought I’d have a better chance of getting hired. Whenever it came to me needing to leave work for an appointment, I’d have to make up for it in overtime. If anyone at work ever saw me take my medication and questioned it, I’d just say they’re vitamins. I like to think that the stigma around bipolar isn’t as bad as it used to be, but I also know how much people gossip within a workplace, which is why I felt more comfortable lying. I don’t think workplaces are up to date with the severity of mental illnesses and general mental health matters. I think they need to up their game and have more awareness days, more resources available to everyone in the workplace and have more compassionate and understanding managers running the place — managers who will understand that mental health days are just as important as physical sick days. It doesn’t matter if you are diagnosed with a mental illness or not; mental health affects everyone. We spend a lot of our lives working, so why is it still such a taboo subject within the workplace? It needs to change.

    My 'Pet Peeves' About Living With Bipolar Disorder

    Being diagnosed with bipolar disorder was one of the hardest conversations I’ve ever had. Not only am I trying to learn how this mental illness affects me, I am also burdened with how it affects others. And boy, do I have some pet peeves surrounding that. My biggest pet peeve is when people group everyone with a mental illness into one big blob and generalize that we are all “crazy and unstable.” Someone you wouldn’t want to leave your child with. Someone you’re frightened to be around. My pet peeve is the negative connotations of bipolar disorder or any mental illness . I can try and try again to teach people about my disorder and be an example that not all people dealing with disorders and illnesses are less than “normal” people. But, it doesn’t always make sense to everyone. I want to open people’s eyes to the fact that everyone is deserving of love. While there are some people who are willing to read up on your mental illness , open their eyes to a world they never thought existed and adapt to what it means to be you, there are also people who are set in stone and nothing will change their mind that we are scary, unlovable and a lost cause. None of that is true. We are not scary, definitely worthy of love and have a reason for being here. It breaks my heart when people dehumanize individuals struggling from any sort of illness. I can see it in their eyes that they pity me, my story and everything I’m going through. I don’t want to be looked down upon, I want to see the same compassion you would give to someone not living with bipolar disorder . We are no different. We are humans just as anyone else on this planet, and all I’m asking is to be treated as such. I do not want to be ashamed of my bipolar disorder . I want to be strong and confident when I tell someone about my mental health and not worry about how they’ll take it and how differently they’ll treat me after. I cringe at the pet peeve I have of the stigma around asking questions. Asking questions, even if I’m the one too afraid to ask. I want people to want to ask me questions to better understand me. I want it to be OK that I still have questions about what I’m going through and to know that learning is still a part of the process, and that’s OK. I don’t want to be so nervous about asking questions about my disorder, as if I’m supposed to know everything about it myself. I am still to this day anxious to ask: Will this affect my work? How will my friends react? How much of my medications and therapy sessions are covered by my insurance? Will I have to take this medication for the rest of my life? Will my symptoms get worse with age? Will this ever go away? Are the side effects of my medication worse than the symptoms of my condition? The list of questions goes on and on. Even though some of my pet peeves are unavoidable, I can still hope things will change and be one more reason why we can turn these grievances around and make a positive outcome out of it. While I can’t change these pet peeves, I can try and adjust how these situations affect me and how I react. Even though I won’t ever be able to escape all of my pet peeves, what I can do is rationalize why I am feeling that way. I can ask myself who it is benefiting from my negative emotions, and center myself around the fact not everyone wants to challenge the way they think; which I have no control over. Whatever your biggest pet peeve is surrounding your mental illness , address it and try to focus on not letting it bug you as much as you normally would.

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    The stigma
    #BipolarStigma

    I have always wondered how people who knows that I have bipolar feel towards me. Do people actually look down on people with mental illness? It affects my self confidence and my self worth..

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