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Five Things to do for Lyme Disease Recovery

When I was researching my popular book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I was surprised to find there were so many people who recovered from Lyme that wanted to help others in the community.

Many attributed getting to a better place to supportive friends and family, helpful people in the medical community, and community members who tirelessly offered counsel and advice. One community leader I met was Ali from the Tick Chicks.

I discovered her Lyme Time Podcast when I was trying to learn more. I got to know her and asked her on my “Love, Hope, Lyme Podcast” how she was able to recover from Lyme.

Five Things That Led to Her Recovery

On the podcast, Ali discusses:

• Her Antibiotic trial

• Surrendering to not chasing the bug and numbers

• Opening her mind to alternative healing

• Symptom relief: supplements, extreme clean eating, rest, faith, baby steps (stretching, walking), eliminating humidity and elevation.

• Brain retraining, breathwork, vagus nerve health, a vision of total cellular health.

As with many Lyme survivors, it took over three years for her Lyme diagnosis to happen.

Ali said, “My doctor said now that we know it’s Lyme, it’s probably not the first thing that you’ve had attack your immune system on a deep level, and it probably won’t be the last. He said that for many of his patients, Lyme disease is somewhere in the middle, and when the Lyme is triggered, that’s their starting point.”

“I was astonished that Lyme wasn’t one of the first things they tested for. I was astonished that they didn’t ask where I had been traveling prior to all these symptoms coming about. I was astonished that my own neurologist blew it off. I was just in shock,” she said.

“I remember telling my doctor that I wondered if it could be Lyme disease, but every time I went online to research it, all it talked about was the ineffectiveness of Lyme testing.”

Like many Lyme survivors, Ali quickly learned that there is no easy and quick path to healing. She then decided to treat her symptoms, which she said made her recovery more manageable.

“I’m a doer. I was very active before this whole bug bite thing happened, and so it was frustrating me. I had to adjust my lifestyle. When I surrendered from trying to solve everything, there was beauty in the ability to see healing going on,” she said.

Why Symptom Control Made All of the Difference

When she shifted her personal care to symptom control, the vastness of healing from the largess of the disease was more manageable.

“There are a lot of intolerances that you get with Lyme disease, such as altitude intolerance, heat intolerance, humidity intolerance. I developed all kinds of joint pain, and I was suddenly very sensitive to chemical smells. I had to swap out all my cleaning supplies for household cleansers that were organic. Same with my skincare. I was reacting to SPF even in my makeup. I was going through this huge mast cell activation. That led me to eliminating certain things,” she said.

Diet was something she had to completely rethink.

She advised, “Lyme survivors need to eat very, very cleanly and stop eating so much. Eating very simple whole foods and proteins will take away the mass cell issue that’s going on in your body.”

“Also, your vitamin Bs are key to Lyme disease recovery, especially if you’re dealing with neurological Lyme. Your body may not be processing it in pill form, so you may have to take it intravenously. When I was really at my worst, I would do one IV a week, and then I would do one every two weeks, and then I would do one a month. I just do them as needed now,” she said.

She said she eliminated hot tubs and massages and focused on baby steps in terms of movement, such as going for very short walks.

“Infrared sauna helped me. Sometimes it can also create a Herxheimer reaction, but you will be able to learn your tolerances with that and eventually go full throttle with it daily,” she said.

How Brain Retraining Helped

I recently covered cognitive and neurological issues with Lyme on the Love, Hope, Lyme podcast. We discussed how brain retraining helped her recover.

Ali said, “When you have Lyme disease, your symptoms may start getting better. You may start feeling a little bit of relief, but what happens is your body is still in fight or flight mode, and it can be very, very detrimental to your healing process. You walk into a room and you’re completely nervous that if you get sick from any one of these people, it’s going to start your symptoms all over again. You’re nervous to be outside in the way that you used to enjoy the outdoors, for example.”

She said brain retraining taps into your vagus nerve and retrains your brain and your body to accept your surroundings, be relaxed again, and get into a state of appreciation and gratitude.

“One of my favorite mantras is ‘I am safe,” she said. “Going through Lyme disease makes you question everything, and it oftentimes will put a person into that next stage of paranoia and panic about situations.”

“I recommend it to anybody who feels like they’re hitting roadblocks, even if you’re doing everything right. Give yourself a vision of your cellular health. Give yourself a chance to see the world in a positive way again, and put mind over matter, and to just be able to turn that brain and those thoughts around to really remembering that you do have a beautiful life and you have a lot to give to this planet, and you will recover,” she concluded.

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Are Coinfections Making Your Lyme Treatment Harder?

When I was doing the research for my book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I was unaware that a tick can transmit additional diseases known as coinfections. Coupled with Lyme disease, the coinfections can make managing a person’s health very challenging to say the least.

On the Love, Hope, Lyme podcast, GLA CEO Laura MacNeill discussed the coinfections and the difficulties in managing them. We discussed the work GLA is doing to improve treatment, diagnostics, and patient care for those who have these diseases, most commonly Bartonella and Babesiosis.

“You can get multiple coinfections from one tick bite, or you might get several bites. I’ve heard stories from people who have encountered tick nests, and they find hundreds of them at once. You need to be aware that these coinfections are not going to all have a bullseye rash, which is sometimes a key sign that you have been bitten by a tick. It’s going to be a very complex treatment process for you to go back to health if you have multiple things happening at once,” she said.

The two most common coinfections are Bartonella and Babesiosis. Unlike the bacteria borrelia burgdorferi that causes Lyme disease, these two are caused by parasites that also are transferred from a tick bite.

“This parasite destroys your red blood cells and leads to symptoms such as air hunger, which is the need to take a deep breath all the time. You can have lightheadedness and feel weak. Other common symptoms are high fever, night sweats, headaches, chills, and maybe even hypoglycemia,” she said. “You’re very sick if you’ve been infected with Babesiosis, especially in the later stage of that parasite infection.”

The challenge in treating these parasitic coinfections has led to GLA funding specific research for treatment.

“Antimicrobial drugs are used for treatment and are often administered in conjunction with homeopathic remedies. They can have some severe side effects. There’s a risk of drug resistance that can be developed, and they may or may not completely eradicate the full parasite,” she said.

To discover better treatment approaches, MacNeill said that GLA is supporting Dr. Choukri Ben Mamoun at Yale in his research.

“It’s a dual therapy approach. What his study highlighted that if you put two different drugs together, the antimalarials tafenoquine and atovaquone, to treat Babesiosis in mice, they have the potential for not only a complete cure, but they show immune protection against reinfection of the Babesia parasite. He’s been able to show that in mice, but then outside of a human host, just in the lab, he’s been able to show that this combination effectively kills three diverse Babesia species. It’s very exciting,” she exclaimed.

“This is very promising, but it doesn’t work for everybody. We need more research and more resources around this work so that we can further the research into clinical trials and continue to resolidify these amazing results he’s had in mice,” she said.

“Bartonella is a stealthy pathogen with a very slow growth period, which gives it the ability to evade detection for a very long time,” she said. “This can cause a range of symptoms including high fever, enlarged lymph nodes, to severe chronic illness that can infect multiple organ systems.”

“Plus, there’s also neuropsychiatric implications with Bartonella as the infection can get into your central nervous system. Testing can become very challenging, and you can have a lot of false negatives with Bartonella,” she said.

“If you think that this might be something you’re exposed to, you must be your own advocate to continue to get testing. Unfortunately, right now, the only good test we have is just going to be looking for it in your bloodstream,” she said.

“We need to have a better diagnostic for Bartonella, so we recently initiated funding for what we’re calling the Bartonella Discovery Project. The study aims to unveil these various hiding spots within the body, including the heart tissue, tissue in the brain, and find if bartonella is inside the cells or is it outside of the cells, or is it in the biofilms within those tissues? They are taking a deep look at where it is when it’s inside the tissues and not in the bloodstream, so we can better understand and find it,” she said.

MacNeill said this research is being done with Dr. Monica Embers at Tulane University, a specialist in Borrelia burgdorferi and Lyme disease.

“She’s evaluating antibiotic efficacy against Lyme disease, identifying treatments to eradicate Lyme disease and other infections, and looking at infections and looking for a cure for all of this. Over the years, she’s expanded her research to include Bartonellosis.”

MacNeill said, “You must have the resources available for scientists to even begin setting up a lab and setting aside a couple of years of their professional life to look at this. The GLA is providing those resources so that the scientists can choose Lyme disease and Babesia work. For GLA, that only happens through generous donors. We’re fully funded by the generosity of individual, corporate, and family foundations. Every gift that’s given helps us say yes to projects like Choukri’s, which is making a huge difference.”

“So many people are sick right now, and they can’t quite clear it with the current treatment. We’re talking 10s to 20s millions of dollars to be able to get it from what we know now, to get it to a clinical practice where you walk in your MD’s office and they say, “Here’s your combination therapy. You’re going to be just fine.”

“We continue to push forward our mission so that we can get these drug therapies to the doctor’s office with great understanding, so Lyme survivors don’t have to worry about it anymore,” she concluded.#

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Returning to Nature Healed this Lyme Survivor

When I was researching my popular book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I had no idea how traumatizing being out in nature could be for some persistent Lyme disease survivors. Even seeing a deer on the side of the road could be triggering.

But I met some people who have attributed embracing the nature they once loved as helpful in healing while still maintaining tick prevention habits. One such person, marine scientist Alayna Bellquist, discussed on my Love, Hope, Lyme podcast how she was able to reduce her Lyme anxieties and challenges by fully embracing her love for the sea and horseback riding as critical to her recovery.

“I’m a classic Lyme person in that I was very overachieving, very people-pleasing, very go, go, go. I live in San Diego, had a relatively frantic life (before being infected),” she said.

Although she was bitten by tick in Southern California, she said she was not tick aware growing up.

“I grew up on Vancouver Island where no one ever spoke about Lyme. I had no tick awareness until I moved to Southern California, and it came up a bit more,” she said.

She said she was bitten when riding her horse, noticed the infection, and immediately sought antibiotic treatment, which mildly helped. In 2020, her symptoms increased, and she became bedridden for a year. Although she tried a lot of conventional and alternative healing methods, and did mental and emotional work, it was getting back into the nature she loved that accelerated her healing.

“Fearing nature is understandable when you have Lyme, but I think that mindset is dangerous. I want chronic Lyme survivors to know that getting back into nature can be helpful, while, of course, ensuring you take proper precautions,” she advised.

Missing Nature Was Brutal, But Led to Healing

“Before I got sick, horseback riding was a big part of my identity. I was a marine scientist and a horseback rider. Every minute I wasn’t working, I wanted to be on the back of a horse. I’ve been nature and animal oriented my whole life,” she said. “There was no limit to how much time I could spend around them.”

She said becoming bedridden and not being out in nature was brutal.

“Having had worked in fisheries for 20 years, I learned that nature always heals, given the chance. Nature is inherently resilient and heals from devastation that you cannot even grasp. These are principles that people are not really taught,” she said.

“Growing up in Vancouver Island, there’s nature everywhere and we are a part of it. I learned that if certain species, such as white sharks, can be in such terrible shape for a long time and then recover, that principle can apply to me, too.”

She said since the bond with nature was so intrinsic to her, she did not realize how fearful of it Lyme survivors might be.

“There is a lot in science to back the healing properties of doing that, especially for your nervous system,” she said.

“My nervous system was 100% fried when I was bitten. I was running all of time and had chronic anxiety and a racing heart. My stomach was always in knots. I also had babesia, but sitting on the earth, calming my nerves, taking the time to look at the stars healed me. I know it’s so basic, but I never looked at the stars before,” she said.

“Being back in nature, while at the same time ensuring that I am preventing another tick bite, has been the most important to my recovery,” she said.

Getting Back into Nature Healed Her

“If you want to bring a species back from depleted numbers, you work on the ecosystem. You work on the things that depleted its resiliency. If there’s pollution or problems in the food chain or warming oceans, for instance, those are the things that you address so that the species can flourish,” she said.

“I asked myself, ‘What are the things that are attacking my ability to heal?’ People-pleasing, never saying no, running 12 to 14-hour days nonstop, perfectionism came to mind. Those are my pollution and overfishing and ocean warming. That was the connection I made. Those are the things that made me incapable of healing,” she realized.

Alayna said although she accepted that she was infected, she didn’t accept it as a lifelong diagnosis. Returning to nature helped with her emotions and mindset.

“I’ve chosen, through a lot of work, to shift from victim to ownership. I radically own what happened to me. Wanting to be a people-pleaser and an overachiever is on me. That’s radical acceptance and responsibility,” she surmised.

“But in owning it, it’s up to me how the direction this goes. I don’t want to lose control. I want control of the next 40, 50 years of my life and returning to nature helped me realize that,” she summarized.

She also advised bringing family members into the healing process.

“You can be there simply by answering the phone, going and doing something in a Lyme friendly way. If all your Lyme family member can do is sit on a rock, go sit on a rock together.”

Fred Diamond is based in Fairfax, Virginia and can be contacted via Facebook. His popular book, “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know” is available on Amazon. The e-version of the book is always free to Lyme survivors. PM Fred on Facebook for your copy.

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Returning to Nature May Help Heal Your Lyme

When I was researching my popular book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I had no idea how traumatizing being out in nature could be for some persistent Lyme disease survivors. Even seeing a deer on the side of the road could be triggering.

But I met some people who have attributed embracing the nature they once loved as helpful in healing while still maintaining tick prevention habits. One such person, marine scientist Alayna Bellquist, discussed on my Love, Hope, Lyme podcast how she was able to reduce her Lyme anxieties and challenges by fully embracing her love for the sea and horseback riding as critical to her recovery.

“I’m a classic Lyme person in that I was very overachieving, very people-pleasing, very go, go, go. I live in San Diego, had a relatively frantic life (before being infected),” she said.

Although she was bitten by tick in Southern California, she said she was not tick aware growing up.

“I grew up on Vancouver Island where no one ever spoke about Lyme. I had no tick awareness until I moved to Southern California, and it came up a bit more,” she said.

She said she was bitten when riding her horse, noticed the infection, and immediately sought antibiotic treatment, which mildly helped. In 2020, her symptoms increased, and she became bedridden for a year. Although she tried a lot of conventional and alternative healing methods, and did mental and emotional work, it was getting back into the nature she loved that accelerated her healing.

“Fearing nature is understandable when you have Lyme, but I think that mindset is dangerous. I want chronic Lyme survivors to know that getting back into nature can be helpful, while, of course, ensuring you take proper precautions,” she advised.

Missing Nature Was Brutal, But Led to Healing

“Before I got sick, horseback riding was a big part of my identity. I was a marine scientist and a horseback rider. Every minute I wasn’t working, I wanted to be on the back of a horse. I’ve been nature and animal oriented my whole life,” she said. “There was no limit to how much time I could spend around them.”

She said becoming bedridden and not being out in nature was brutal.

“Having had worked in fisheries for 20 years, I learned that nature always heals, given the chance. Nature is inherently resilient and heals from devastation that you cannot even grasp. These are principles that people are not really taught,” she said.

“Growing up in Vancouver Island, there’s nature everywhere and we are a part of it. I learned that if certain species, such as white sharks, can be in such terrible shape for a long time and then recover, that principle can apply to me, too.”

She said since the bond with nature was so intrinsic to her, she did not realize how fearful of it Lyme survivors might be.

“There is a lot in science to back the healing properties of doing that, especially for your nervous system,” she said.

“My nervous system was 100% fried when I was bitten. I was running all of time and had chronic anxiety and a racing heart. My stomach was always in knots. I also had babesia, but sitting on the earth, calming my nerves, taking the time to look at the stars healed me. I know it’s so basic, but I never looked at the stars before,” she said.

“Being back in nature, while at the same time ensuring that I am preventing another tick bite, has been the most important to my recovery,” she said.

Getting Back into Nature Healed Her

“If you want to bring a species back from depleted numbers, you work on the ecosystem. You work on the things that depleted its resiliency. If there’s pollution or problems in the food chain or warming oceans, for instance, those are the things that you address so that the species can flourish,” she said.

“I asked myself, ‘What are the things that are attacking my ability to heal?’ People-pleasing, never saying no, running 12 to 14-hour days nonstop, perfectionism came to mind. Those are my pollution and overfishing and ocean warming. That was the connection I made. Those are the things that made me incapable of healing,” she realized.

Alayna said although she accepted that she was infected, she didn’t accept it as a lifelong diagnosis. Returning to nature helped with her emotions and mindset.

“I’ve chosen, through a lot of work, to shift from victim to ownership. I radically own what happened to me. Wanting to be a people-pleaser and an overachiever is on me. That’s radical acceptance and responsibility,” she surmised.

“But in owning it, it’s up to me how the direction this goes. I don’t want to lose control. I want control of the next 40, 50 years of my life and returning to nature helped me realize that,” she summarized.

She also advised bringing family members into the healing process.

“You can be there simply by answering the phone, going and doing something in a Lyme friendly way. If all your Lyme family member can do is sit on a rock, go sit on a rock together.”#lyme #LymeDisease #ChronicIllness

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Managing Lyme Disease Stressors

When I was researching information for my book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I wanted to learn how stress can flare Lyme symptoms, and what Lyme survivors could do to minimize their stress levels. Many of the hundreds of Lyme survivors I engaged with had told me that they were trying to reduce the stress in their lives.

Stressors, big and small, commonly spur debilitating flares, and can happen at any time, often without any warning. I discussed this with Dr. Diane Mueller.

“With Lyme, it’s almost like chickenpox, where it’s in remission. We have dormant persister cells that are laying just below the surface, likely in our nerves and joint spaces, since those are two common areas that we tend to see Lyme. If we’re not getting overly stressed, they stay in remission,” she said.

It All Starts in the Brain

Many Lyme survivors struggle with brain fog, which can be very stressful.

“It’s tricky, because there’s not a medical diagnosis for brain fog. The closest thing we have is mild cognitive impairment, which is like, oh, we don’t have dementia, but the brain is not working as well as it could be,” she said. “Mold toxins and toxic metals are also contributing to that inflammatory process in the brain, because brain fog really is the brain being inflamed,” she said.

“Especially in the early onset standpoint of Lyme, we see cortisol, that stress hormone, rise,” she said. “Cortisol typically will fall for most people, but when that cortisol rises, it can negatively impact the hippocampus, the memory center of our brain. That can contribute to the brain fog, that is related to dilemmas such as, “What did I come into the room for, or where did I park my car?”

Dr. Mueller said, “There’s bad stress and good stress. Good stress oftentimes is called eustress. An example of good stress is exercise, which is technically a stress on the body, but then the body recovers and is stronger.”

From a Lyme disease perspective, what we’re really looking to do from a stress standpoint is keep ourselves regulated from longer-term stressors.

“The stress that I’m concerned about is when the brain starts to get dysregulated because we’ve been under stress for so long and we’re not adapting to it. When that happens, the brain loses its capacity to properly see how much cortisol, which is our stress hormone, is in the blood,” she said.

She continued, “When our brain loses our ability to see that, then one of two things happens. It’s either thinks the cortisol’s too low or it’s thinking our cortisol is too high and it’s not, and then our cortisol crashes. Either one of those things causes problems.”

“What we see also is dysregulated cortisol can contribute to immune dysfunction. One of the big relationships we see with stress and Lyme is this imbalance because of this dysfunction, and then suddenly, our immune system is not working properly, the signals are not getting sent out. That’s where we get that resurgence of Lyme disease,” she said.

“No human can eliminate stress in our lives. The question is how we work with this stress, so it doesn’t become this dysfunctional brain pattern,” she concluded.

Stressor Response

Dr. Mueller is also a chronic Lyme survivor who has had to learn how to deal with traumatic responses to stressors. She said this helps her related to what Lyme survivors go through.

“I thought about moving to a deserted island because I was dying and that sounded like the best way to go out. I’ve seen other people say they could not work or that they had to leave their partner,” she said.

“These types of fight, flight, freeze actions are normal responses, and is what happens when the body goes into a stressful scenario. Your body is doing a very normal thing when a stressor occurs,” she said.

She said these types of scenarios are typically run by hormones such as adrenaline and the problem is when we are in these types of stressful situations and the hormones that take over are not proactively helping the body treat the disease.

“The vicious cycle we get into in this is when we feel those things, we secrete all that adrenaline, then we’re sending signals to our body to say, “break down tissue, not heal, not repair.”

“When we do that, the Lyme and the infections and the symptoms can get worse. Then we just get stuck in this vicious chicken and the egg, where the adrenaline in the mind is worsening the symptoms, and the symptoms are worsening the adrenaline in the mind,” she said.

Getting to the Root Cause

To solve the stress problem, she said we need to get to the root cause of what’s challenging the Lyme survivor, which in some cases can be deeper than the Lyme and even the coinfections.

“I’ve seen many patients who have seen dozens of different doctors, and their problems are not being solved because Lyme disease is only one of the root causes. Yes, we want to address Lyme, but we can get really lost with the root when it’s other things. I’m talking about roots beyond the Lyme and the co-infections,” she said.

“For instance, the exposure to mold is triggering of that recurrence of Lyme. Maybe the first time they had Lyme, they just had flu symptoms,” she said. “Then they move into a moldy place and get chronic Lyme symptoms. It gets diagnosed as Lyme, and they don’t realize that their home is causing it.”

She said this root cause analysis can help the Lyme survivor truly understand what they are truly facing and then put a treatment plan in place that will be more effective. This can reduce much of the stress they are dealing with.

Listen to all episodes of the Love, Hope, Lyme Podcast or on YouTube.

Fred Diamond is based in Fairfax, Virginia and can be contacted via Facebook. His popular book, “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know” is available on Amazon. The e-version of the book is always free to Lyme survivors. PM Fred on Facebook for your copy.

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I'm new here!

Hi, my name is Amy (TheLittleFlower3) I'm here because I live with Lyme and realize more and more how it affects me in my mind, body and even deep in my heart.

#MightyTogether #LymeDisease

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I’m new here!

Hi, my name is SophiaJoy. I am on a journey to heal myself holistically from chronic illness. I am looking for others to conversate and share with on a similar path 🌻

#MightyTogether #LymeDisease #Fibromyalgia #RheumatoidArthritis #PTSD #Grief #Anxiety #Depression

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Can Nature Help You Heal?

When I was researching my book “Love, Hope, Lyme: What Family Members, Partners, and Friends Who Love a Chronic Lyme Survivor Need to Know,” I had no idea how traumatizing being out in nature could be for some persistent Lyme disease survivors. Even seeing a deer on the side of the road could be triggering.

But I met some people who have attributed embracing the nature they once loved as helpful in healing while still maintaining tick prevention habits. One such person, marine scientist Alayna Bellquist, discussed on my Love, Hope, Lyme podcast how she was able to reduce her Lyme anxieties and challenges by fully embracing her love for the sea and horseback riding as critical to her recovery.

Are you comfortable being back in nature like she is?#LymeDisease #Babesiosis

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Lyme rage

This is the only way i know to let this beast go. Lyme rage, it’s real, it’s ugly and don’t get in the path of someone with it. I’ve had Lyme 38 years, the entire time I’ve lived across the river from Lyme CT. My husband has it, even my dog does. I’m the chronic one and the one that gets repeatedly reinfected. And hitting my head. I’m at around 30 or more concussions. Lyme and head injuries are not a good mix. Neither is a Candida die off, not the three B’s but systemic Candidiasis’. I’ve been on and off antibiotics since i was a kid. I’m 68 now, my gut has finally healed but my diet is killing me mentally, no dairy no sugar no wheat says the former carboholic. Candida needs sugar to live on. She begs for it relentlessly, Candy is an evil bitch. Chills, mood changes and horrific skin rashes that smell like death no matter how much i wash.

But today the thing I’m most angry about is what my psychiatrist told me. He’s affiliated with Yale the great Lyme disease deniers and torturers of Lyme patients especially women since the test rarely works on us. For 12 years i tried to convince him Lyme was real. He went with silence thankfully and not mocking and abuse. But 3 months ago he said all of your issues are likely due to the Lyme and i have an office full of patients like you.

Excuse me, could you repeat this again. You now believe persistent Lyme exists, no test needed, symptoms obvious.

i should be happy but I’m furious. My country has betrayed me. Used me as a guinea pig in their biological weapons experiments without my permission. Dropping ticks on us out of airplanes. But the ticks hopped on all the birds that landed on Plum Island and so a pandemic began. They were supposed to ask per their own manual Title 50, Google it.

My country stole my life, my career, my hobbies, my friends and family. All that’s left is my faithful and loyal husband with Agent Orange cancer. At least they admitted to that and pay him. Me they throw $2000/ mo at and expect me to pay for my own Lyme care.

I want reparations, i want medical care. , i need a caregiver since you took away my pain meds I’m bedridden in pain. You destroyed my life and that of millions of people.

Why did things change? COvid.! Ironically Covid acts a lot like late Lyme. Fatigue cognitive changes, memory issues and the bonus hypoinflation of the lungs or shortness of breath. And long haulers are all over the place.

As far as I’m concerned the biggest war is right here in the USA and caused by them. I get nothing from them, I’m left alone because no one knows the truth unless they looked. It’s there but even the Drs don’t know. It’s so bad that they finally had to do something. There are now CDC guidelines in place for late Lyme. If you’re on Medicare you can get a full tick borne panel paid for by Medicare at a specialty lab, do it. But preferably please use the built in executioner when you’ve had enough. It will come to your head usually with unbearable pain and dare to say wouldn’t you be happier dead. My answer is no. Fuck you Lyme disease and Uncle Sam.

I’m forever a POW of the USArny’s biological weapons experiments gone horribly awry and i live in my cell alone waiting to die

Tell everyone it’s really real (even tho we knew it)

the emperor is indeed naked but the people aren’t laughing they’re crying

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#ChronicIllness fighter . Living her best life! Overcomer ! #epilpseywarior Hidden Invisible Autitsc Striped zebra! With a creative mind!

#epilpsey Sezure awareness ; #MentalHealth
Hidden disbalty . Fribomlga warrior #LymeDisease #AspergersSyndrome / autism awareness! ADHD . #OsteogenesisImperfecta { brittle bones/ cognitive tissue disorder} hypersensitivity.
Sensory processing disorder! #JointHypermobilitySyndrome hypermobile Elers Danilo’s syndrome #RsdCrps

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